iPhone, Android, iPad, or Nexus – what Apps work for you?

Today's latte, Google Play.

Today’s latte, Google Play. (Photo credit: yukop)

Back in 2012, I asked my subscribers (click here if you would like to subscribe to the newsletter) to tell me what apps they have on their smartphones and tablets.  Here are some of the responses (the programs that are no longer around are strikethrough:

Andrew de Guttadauro, expert in business development (IP, M&A in the biotech world), said, “Here are the ones that I currently favor:
Communication:  Skype (great for saving money when overseas and a wifi connection is in hand)
Organization:  Evernote & Pocket (I’m a big believer in cloud-based software and these two apps work great in tandem to allow one to clip, tag, organize, and store just about anything that comes across a computer, smart phone, tablet, or other similar device)
RSS & News Streamers:  Reeder, Flipboard, Zite, and Feedly (admittedly, this is overkill, but I’m a news and media junkie and these apps all do a wonderful job of combining my RSS feeds, and other news sources of interest, into organized news channels/feeds that are more pleasing than the underlying RSS engine – Google Reader, in my case)
Task Management:  I favor Wunderlist because, like my other apps, it’s platform-agnostic and cloud-based, so I can access my “to do’s” whenever and however I like or need (Remember the Milk is a good alternative)
Data and Info Storage:  Dropbox is great, but it’s important people realize that Dropbox isn’t especially secure as the company wants to give users the choice of security/encryption software so it’s important to use 2-step authentication plus “True Crypt” if using Drop Box to store anything even remotely sensitive
E-mail:  I use the native Apple app for Outlook but favor Google’s Gmail app to access the latter service (despite it being from Google, this app could use additional improvements).  I also recommend using Xobni if possible, to help sift through Outlook more efficiently.
News and Sports:  ESPN, Huffington Post, The Atlantic
Travel:  Kayak
Web:  Chrome’s my favored browser on all devices
– Shopping:  Amazon (via app on iPhone or via browser and website on iPad), Target app
– Dining:  Open table, Yelp (applicable in the shopping category as well)
Social Media:  LinkedIn
– Bookmarks:  X-Marks
– Media:  Amazon streaming, Netflix streaming, Hulu Plus, HBO GO

That pretty much covers the apps.  I would recommend to everyone that 2-step authentication should be used on any site where it can be enabled and that separate signups be used on any site where possible (never use Google, Facebook, or LinkedIn username/passwords to access other sites as you’re needlessly exposing yourself to sequential hacking).  Finally, I use a password management tool but do not have the app loaded on either smart phone or tablet as it makes me too antsy viz. potential loss of the device. I also don’t have bank or insurance apps loaded on my devices for the same reason and would recommend using such apps only if you don’t keep permanently signed in to either (I’d rather access such info through the added hassle of the web browser instead).

I hope this proves helpful and look forward to hearing what others are using.”

These are available in both Apple and Android.  Reeder, True Crypt, Xnobi and X-Marks are Apple-specific.

Personally, and many devices later, I have many that Andrew had and some others.  They do multiply!!

LinkedIn
Workboard
Contactually
Evernote
MailChimp
ColorNote
Drive
Dropbox
Slideshare
Startmeeting

Facebook
Outlook
Pinterest
GoToWebinar
GoToMeeting
Hangouts
Instagram
Message+
Snapchat
Twitter


Navigation (Google maps)
News & Weather (native Android)
Calendar (native Android)
Contacts (native Android)
Messenger/Messaging/Voice Message
Voice Recorder
Voice Search
Memo
Gmail and my other emails
Adobe Reader
YouTube
TED
Out of Milk (but only for grocery shopping)
an alarm clock, a stopwatch, a calculator, a music player
Kindle and Play Books
and my camera and gallery
Plus more, of course.

I’ve only linked a few of these, all the rest can be found at the app marketplaces. 

What do you have on yours?



Is Your LinkedIn Profile a Dud?

Most jobs are filled by personal networking.

https://biosciencejobkit.com/is-your-linkedin-profile-a-dud/But if you want a recruiter to call you, we have to know that you exist.  Make it easy for us – Fill out your LinkedIn Profile! Recruiters are on LinkedIn every day. Even if you are not now looking for a job, keep your profile current. Since most jobs last only about 5 years these days, having a LinkedIn profile is essential.

keywords for job search

Job and key concept

Recruiters search by keywords.  Some of those are job titles at particular companies.  Some are by industry and title.  Many are by keywords, skills and expertise. 

You need to:

Have a professional head shot – It can be taken by a friend on a cell phone camera, but it needs to be of you, in a professional outfit, hair combed, and a smile on your face.  Think – this is the first impression.  How do you want to be perceived?  First impressions count.

Your headline section does not need to be your current or last title, but it should contain your most descriptive keyword, one that the general public would understand.  Don’t look desperate; don’t use this to say “looking”.  

Your summary is where you can shine, show what you like to do and use those keywords.  Use them naturally, don’t spam by repeating the keyword multiple times in a row.  Remember that you are writing to create a professional impression.

Knowing your keywords can be a challenge, especially if you are staring at a blank screen and trying to capture them out of thin air. Click here for some suggestions

Your experience is proof that you can do the things you have described in your summary.  Use the space.  Use keywords and, if you can, use numbers – for example, “managed 6 people doing (keyword)”.  Avoid passive verbs, use active ones

If you choose to use the Skills and Expertise section (and I encourage you to do so), ask your first degree connections to endorse you for those skills that you want to highlight and which they know that you have – the person that worked at the next bench will know that you can do PCR (or whatever) but a recruiter will only know that you said you could. 

The more you can complete your profile, the more people will know you.  You want a job that suits you, not one that requires you to do only the things you don’t like to do.  Use your LinkedIn Profile to showcase your interests as well as your skills.

If you find yourself polishing your resume before you have identified any open positions, use that effort on your LI Profile instead.  Sending a generic resume to job boards and openings is like making multiple copies, stuffing them in empty bottles and tossing them in the ocean in the hope that someone will rescue you.  We know that recruiters look in LinkedIn, not in the ocean.

Remember that less than 20% of jobs are filled through job postings and less than 5% by recruiters.  You do need to have a web presence on LinkedIn, but even more, you need to use it to grow your personal network and number of friends.

Book a review of your LinkedIn Profile here

 

Changing industries?

Kerry Hannon on changing industries“Changing industries? Meet people. If there’s a particular industry you’re interested in, join an association affiliated with it.  Look for volunteer opportunities in that field. Attend industry and professional meetings and conferences. Glom on to alumni groups and the career center at your alma mater where can find help with resumé polishing and smoothing your interviewing skills along with offering networking opportunities. Join LinkedIn. It’s great way to build a professional network. Employers troll it for perspective hires.” Kerry Hannon

 

Kerry has great points!

 

In addition:

 

Immerse yourself in the new industry – subscribe to trade magazines, learn as much as you can about the industry, Google it, subscribe to blogs about it, look for groups on LinkedIn, see if there are groups on Facebook, look for the Twitter hashtag, see if YouTube has any videos about it, go to a physical library and ask at the information desk, read the trade magazine there, find out which companies are in the industry in your town.

 

Is this industry at all close to the one you want to leave? The biotech development of drugs is not much different from the development of biofuels.  The auto industry has much in common with the large appliance industry (big metal box with lots of moving parts bought by consumers).  What do you know that could be of use in the new industry?

 

What are the overlapping functions?  Are you in one of them?  For example: Finance and accounting takes place in all industries and even non-profits.  Sales crosses many industries and technical sales does as well. Research may well transfer.

 

Where are you coming from and where do you want to go?  Do you have a list of skills?  Check out O-Net the latest version of the Directory of Occupational Titles that the Department of Labor puts out. Which of your skills match those used in your preferred industry?  Check out the advanced search function on O-Net.

 

There are many things to do in the world, many occupations.  What do you want yours to be?  Only you can choose.

 

What do you think?  Comment on this post!

 

 

 

 

Do You Use These Alternatives to Your Resume?

There has been quite a bit written about alternatives to resumes these days.  But can you get away with just your LinkedIn profile?

Résumé

Résumé (Photo credit: Michael Paul Escanuelas)

A résumé is a marketing piece designed to get you the interview, not the job.  It is also a scratch pad for the interviewer.  Either way it is a summation or abstract of your work history, not your whole life  or even your whole work history, on two pieces of paper.  Even a biography is edited.  If you have ever tried to document a whole day of your life with pictures and posts, you know that a résumé must be edited.  It only needs to go back 10 years, but it must address the problem(s) that the particular interviewer is trying to solve by hiring someone.

It is only one piece of your marketing collateral.

The others could be:

A number of separate hard-copy marketing pieces: If you are in sales or business development, your sales record or your deal sheet. If you are in early research, your publications list or patents.  What are you proud of in your job?

Your CV

– curriculum vitae or the story of your education and work, publications, speeches, articles, books and book chapters.

Your LinkedIn profile

– don’t waste this space by simply posting your generic resume, use it to highlight those things that you like to do and are good at doing.

Get your free LinkedIn Profile Checklist here

Google+/Google Profiles

– This is one of the hot new things, especially for the tech world at the moment

Your Facebook profile

– more casual but do edit your life on this; it is public and there may well be things that you don’t want the entire world to see.

Your Twitter page

– choose a nice background and do some editing of the things you have posted.

Your personal website or blog

– show what you are good at, write about the issues in your field, take a stand or ask a question.

Your video resume

(posted somewhere or sent as a free-standing document).  The point of this is really to answer the question of your personal presentation: Do you dress appropriately for the job?  Is your speech clear and understandable to the hiring manager?  Do you have any quirks or tics that might become annoying over time.  Do you seem self-confident and capable?

Your YouTube postings or channel

– can you do a presentation about your skills? Or is this your video resume?

An Infographic (re.vu, visualize.me and kinzaa.com)

— best used for graphic design jobs, this is the latest on the scene.  Some are excellent, but none can be read by Applicant Tracking Systems.  Consider this as an extra that you take with you to an interview or something that you post on Facebook or Twitter or Pinterest.  It should not be your only marketing piece.

Remember that each of these must be targeted to your audience.  A hiring manager may well want to see your CV, but has no time for a video (free standing or on YouTube).  A recruiter or HR person wants something that fits into her workflow and if you make her download your LinkedIn profile she may simply pass on your candidacy.

We have entered the age of marketing, brand marketing and personal marketing, employment marketing and candidate marketing.  There is information galore on the internet to help you learn, but remember that no marketing piece gets you a job.  Only you in an interview can do that.

Are you in the biosciences?  Want to talk about your job search strategies?  Book a call here

The Right Tools for the Job

tools 3My Dad was a woodworker.  He built furniture. My Mom was a homemaker and baker.  Both of them would always get out the tools and materials needed before they started a project. 

Job search, if nothing else, is a project.  It is not simply a wish.  What tools and materials do you gather to accomplish this project?

The materials you will use are your skills, expertise, desires, career goals, etc.  These will always be unique to each person. 

The tools you use will be used over and over again.  Jobs may only last 3-5 years these days, so you will be doing job search projects at least 6 times in your working life.

The most useful tool is your professional network and the means you use to keep track of it and maintain it. 

I use:

  • Outlook to track my scheduled meetings, calls and coffee dates
  • Access to keep my lists and data (I have all the people I’ve ever talked with about jobs, their contact info, where they work and what their title is, sometimes who their boss is)
  • Excel (as the way to put the info into Access or instead of Access)
  • MailChimp  and AceOfSales to manage my regular emails and newsletter,
  • LinkedIn to keep up with some of my network (not all use it!),
  • Facebook mostly for my non-career network (grandson pictures! And politics!),
  • Google+ to explore this amazing platform and as a supplement to LI and FB
  • Twitter to join the conversations,
  • Pinterest to stay informed visually
  • YouTube to connect with people who prefer this media
  • and some specialized sites like Biowebspin. 

I also use the US Postal Service and cards that my sister makes by hand (such art!). 

But these are general tools, useful for many things.

For a job search, you may want specialized tools like JibberJobber or SuccessHawk.  Although these may be the “mini doughnut maker” or the “120 piece diamond tip carving burr set”, those tools you lust after but never actually use. 

You will also want some lists, checklists and templates.

  • Lists of your skills, the tasks you are competent in and like doing, your expertise, your keywords
  • PAR statements for each problem you have solved
  • Checklists of the process of job search
  • Resume templates
  • Follow up content templates

If you are starting a job search this year, what tools do you already have?  What tools do you need to acquire?  Have you gathered your materials before you start?

Tell me what you prefer!

Social Media & Your Job Search

Some common sense from a colleague from Canada – Pronexia

Social Media & Your Job Search – Please Don’t Post That Party Pic

Mayer in her viral video, "I Am Your Gran...

Mayer in her viral video, “I Am Your Grandma” (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

There’s no doubt about it, these days we all spend a decent amount of our time on social media. Whether it’s checking out the latest viral video on YouTube, confirming our attendance to a friend’s birthday party on Facebook or searching for a new recipe on Pinterest – it’s become an everyday occurrence in our lives. That isn’t going to change (unless you move to some remote jungle location).

When preparing to search for a new career opportunity, you need to be sure that all of your social profiles are in check.  Here are a few pointers to help you make sure you get started on the right foot:  For more click here
If you are fresh out of school and looking for your first job, this advice is right on target.  If you have been in the industry for some time, take another look at your postings. And decide if those pictures of your kids serve both you and, eventually, them in the job market. Managing your career and personal brand is becoming more and more important.
Need some help with this? Check out Connie On Call or Office Hours.  

Careers in Biotech and Drug Development

Careers in Biotechnology and Drug Development

Hi, I’m Connie Hampton here at Hampton and Associates Scientific and Executive
Search Services.  Today I’m reviewing a book by my friend Toby Freedman called Career Opportunities in Biotechnology and Drug Development.

She describes each of over 100 positions, talks about what each one entails and describes career tracks, typical days, pros and cons, salary and challenges and what you need to excel in each.  She talks about how they all fit together in a company.

I highly recommend this book for both job seekers and for HR people who need to write position descriptions for hiring – especially if a particular role is new to you.

You can get this book from Cold Spring Harbor Lab Press or through Amazon.

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