How to build and develop your LinkedIn Profile

Your LinkedIn Profile

How to build and develop your LinkedIn profile

How to build and develop your LinkedIn Profile.  It is necessary that you be visible online.  LinkedIn is the premier professional site, but you probably have others – trade associations, G+, etc.  Post there as well!

The job seeker’s tasks are:

To be visible online, known to the people in the companies you want to work for, remembered before they hire someone else, liked and trusted to solve their problem.

The podcast is above but if you would like to see the webcast, click here

For more help, check out the products and programs offered in the menu or email me at connie@biosciencejobkit.com

Why Dragon-Slaying Stories?

Is Your LinkedIn Profile a Dud?

How Recruiters use Your LinkedIn Profile to Screen People Out or In

Do You Want to Be Found by Recruiters and Hiring Managers?

Ways of Using LinkedIn in your Job Search

LinkedIn in your job search

Image via Wikipedia

LinkedIn is a really important tool for your job search.

Of course you have completely filled out your profile on LinkedIn, yes?  And not simply posted a generic resume.  Instead, you have written about the skills you enjoy using and what you have done with them.  You have filled it out as completely as possible and also posted a good picture of you, smiling.

While you are on your profile site, click on the “number of people who have viewed your profile in the last 3 days” button on the right hand side. Do this daily.

These are your first and second degree connections by name and anonymous if more distantly connected.  You can connect with your second degree viewers in many ways – directly, through a first degree connection (check on the viewers profile), through a group you both belong to (you do belong to appropriate groups, yes?), or through the use of Inmail.

Thank them for looking at your profile.

Ask them what you can do for them today.  Interact! Network!  It doesn’t take much time at all!

You need at least 400 people in your LinkedIn Connections to really make this work for you. Most need to be people in your niche, not recruiters, or even your college roommates if they are not in your industry.

“Business friends” are the ones you will work for, find jobs for and who will find jobs for you.  Who are yours?  Do you have a list on your computer?  Do you contact them regularly, even when you are NOT looking for a job?

LinkedIn in your job search is not the only tool.

Your email and social media are important as well.  The phone is too.  Do you know how to use them, long before you write a resume?

Need some help figuring out who they should be or how to keep in contact with them?  Book a coaching call here.  ($125/30 minutes)

How I Wish I Were The Fairy Job Mother Who Could Simply Grant Wishes!

fairy job motherWouldn’t it be wonderful if I were the Fairy Job Mother who could simply grant wishes? 

But I’m not that Fairy Job Mother.  I think she retired in 1929. You are the closest we can get.  It is your career after all.  And you know where you are, where you want to go and which steps will take you there.  

Here’s something you can do NOW that can ensure your career for years to come.

Free Article and Tips
5 Networking Secrets to Steer Your Career to Greater Heights
Get these instantly and you will also receive our monthly articles and e-zine.

Job fairs, online applications or recruiters do NOT fill 75-85% of all jobs.  But none of us have learned in school how to find a job in a way that we manage and control and which will serve us well the rest of our careers.  Since, as a recruiter, I know both sides of the job search, I can show you how to find and choose the companies you will want to work in, the people you will want to work with and how to be known by the people who will hire you.

Can you relate to this?

Once upon a time, in your grandfather’s or great grandfather’s time, it was possible to start working for a company straight out of school and retire 30 or 40 years later with a gold watch and a pension.  But not now  Now we are doing well to stay with the same company for five years before having to change companies to move up the corporate ladder or even to just keep working.  In some industries, a two-year stay is doing well.

None of us receive lessons in looking for work.  Our education is all about the core skills we need, not where and how to put them to use.  Networking is a skill that can be taught as well, but we are not taught that either.  And in this economy, no job is proof against lay-offs.

What some of my clients have said

Liora Engel-Smith   “Connie gave me excellent and detailed advice regarding entering the work force (via LinkedIn).”

Mark Zawadzki “Connie gave me clear direction and a plan that made sense. She has the ability to listen, understand the situation and sum it up quickly, and provide recommendations for moving forward. Connie was a valuable resource and I highly recommend her for anyone in search of a new position, career or contact.” (via LinkedIn)

Mike van Horn “I’m impressed with Connie’s business model. She has carved out a niche in a very competitive industry that meets the specialized needs of her clients and plays to her strengths.” (via LinkedIn)

Juliet Philips “I had contacted Connie when searching for jobs and I was very impressed with how quickly she responded. She took the time to explain and guide me through the process and gave me meaningful insights on how to go about finding a job that I want. She is someone I would recommend to all my colleagues.” (via LinkedIn)

Dan Biondi “A friend and colleague referred me to Connie for help with my search. Connie responded immediately, gave me a useable road map and advice regarding a senior level executive search. She is patient, considerate, and quite easy to engage in conversation. I came away from one conversation with meaningful insights on how to structure my personal search strategy. I will recommend Connie to anyone who has a problem that needs to be solved by a new view from an outside the company executive.”  (via LinkedIn)

Orest Hurko, MD “Remarkably thoughtful, generous and wise. Received a cold call from me when I was just starting a search, and patiently guided me through realities of finding employment — most of which had nothing to do with her services or that of any other headhunter. Though we had never met, her genuine concern was helping me out, not scoring a new client. Not many people would do that. And it worked. Excellent advice.” (via LinkedIn)


SECRET #2: Strategic Networking

 

Networking ad 3SECRET #2:  Strategic Networking

So what is strategic networking?  It is not handing out your personal card at every party or event, nor is it just getting on LinkedIn, etc.

Strategic networking is using your time in a targeted manner to connect with the people who will be your career network for the rest of your career.

To be strategic you need to know a few things:

What exactly do you want to do in your next job? – write it down!

Where exactly do you want to work? – locally or can you move?

What companies are in that locale?

Which ones do you think are interesting and would need your skills?  Costco doesn’t hire biotech scientists.

Who do you know who works at each one?  Not the hiring manager and not the person who is trying to do your job and his own.

The people you need to network with first are the ones who can give you the inside scoop about the company.

iPhone, Android, iPad, or Nexus – what Apps work for you?

Today's latte, Google Play.

Today’s latte, Google Play. (Photo credit: yukop)

Back in 2012, I asked my subscribers (click here if you would like to subscribe to the newsletter) to tell me what apps they have on their smartphones and tablets.  Here are some of the responses (the programs that are no longer around are strikethrough:

Andrew de Guttadauro, expert in business development (IP, M&A in the biotech world), said, “Here are the ones that I currently favor:
Communication:  Skype (great for saving money when overseas and a wifi connection is in hand)
Organization:  Evernote & Pocket (I’m a big believer in cloud-based software and these two apps work great in tandem to allow one to clip, tag, organize, and store just about anything that comes across a computer, smart phone, tablet, or other similar device)
RSS & News Streamers:  Reeder, Flipboard, Zite, and Feedly (admittedly, this is overkill, but I’m a news and media junkie and these apps all do a wonderful job of combining my RSS feeds, and other news sources of interest, into organized news channels/feeds that are more pleasing than the underlying RSS engine – Google Reader, in my case)
Task Management:  I favor Wunderlist because, like my other apps, it’s platform-agnostic and cloud-based, so I can access my “to do’s” whenever and however I like or need (Remember the Milk is a good alternative)
Data and Info Storage:  Dropbox is great, but it’s important people realize that Dropbox isn’t especially secure as the company wants to give users the choice of security/encryption software so it’s important to use 2-step authentication plus “True Crypt” if using Drop Box to store anything even remotely sensitive
E-mail:  I use the native Apple app for Outlook but favor Google’s Gmail app to access the latter service (despite it being from Google, this app could use additional improvements).  I also recommend using Xobni if possible, to help sift through Outlook more efficiently.
News and Sports:  ESPN, Huffington Post, The Atlantic
Travel:  Kayak
Web:  Chrome’s my favored browser on all devices
– Shopping:  Amazon (via app on iPhone or via browser and website on iPad), Target app
– Dining:  Open table, Yelp (applicable in the shopping category as well)
Social Media:  LinkedIn
– Bookmarks:  X-Marks
– Media:  Amazon streaming, Netflix streaming, Hulu Plus, HBO GO

That pretty much covers the apps.  I would recommend to everyone that 2-step authentication should be used on any site where it can be enabled and that separate signups be used on any site where possible (never use Google, Facebook, or LinkedIn username/passwords to access other sites as you’re needlessly exposing yourself to sequential hacking).  Finally, I use a password management tool but do not have the app loaded on either smart phone or tablet as it makes me too antsy viz. potential loss of the device. I also don’t have bank or insurance apps loaded on my devices for the same reason and would recommend using such apps only if you don’t keep permanently signed in to either (I’d rather access such info through the added hassle of the web browser instead).

I hope this proves helpful and look forward to hearing what others are using.”

These are available in both Apple and Android.  Reeder, True Crypt, Xnobi and X-Marks are Apple-specific.

Personally, and many devices later, I have many that Andrew had and some others.  They do multiply!!

LinkedIn
Workboard
Contactually
Evernote
MailChimp
ColorNote
Drive
Dropbox
Slideshare
Startmeeting

Facebook
Outlook
Pinterest
GoToWebinar
GoToMeeting
Hangouts
Instagram
Message+
Snapchat
Twitter


Navigation (Google maps)
News & Weather (native Android)
Calendar (native Android)
Contacts (native Android)
Messenger/Messaging/Voice Message
Voice Recorder
Voice Search
Memo
Gmail and my other emails
Adobe Reader
YouTube
TED
Out of Milk (but only for grocery shopping)
an alarm clock, a stopwatch, a calculator, a music player
Kindle and Play Books
and my camera and gallery
Plus more, of course.

I’ve only linked a few of these, all the rest can be found at the app marketplaces. 

What do you have on yours?



Is Your LinkedIn Profile a Dud?

Most jobs are filled by personal networking.

https://biosciencejobkit.com/is-your-linkedin-profile-a-dud/But if you want a recruiter to call you, we have to know that you exist.  Make it easy for us – Fill out your LinkedIn Profile! Recruiters are on LinkedIn every day. Even if you are not now looking for a job, keep your profile current. Since most jobs last only about 5 years these days, having a LinkedIn profile is essential.

keywords for job search

Job and key concept

Recruiters search by keywords.  Some of those are job titles at particular companies.  Some are by industry and title.  Many are by keywords, skills and expertise. 

You need to:

Have a professional head shot – It can be taken by a friend on a cell phone camera, but it needs to be of you, in a professional outfit, hair combed, and a smile on your face.  Think – this is the first impression.  How do you want to be perceived?  First impressions count.

Your headline section does not need to be your current or last title, but it should contain your most descriptive keyword, one that the general public would understand.  Don’t look desperate; don’t use this to say “looking”.  

Your summary is where you can shine, show what you like to do and use those keywords.  Use them naturally, don’t spam by repeating the keyword multiple times in a row.  Remember that you are writing to create a professional impression.

Knowing your keywords can be a challenge, especially if you are staring at a blank screen and trying to capture them out of thin air. Click here for some suggestions

Your experience is proof that you can do the things you have described in your summary.  Use the space.  Use keywords and, if you can, use numbers – for example, “managed 6 people doing (keyword)”.  Avoid passive verbs, use active ones

If you choose to use the Skills and Expertise section (and I encourage you to do so), ask your first degree connections to endorse you for those skills that you want to highlight and which they know that you have – the person that worked at the next bench will know that you can do PCR (or whatever) but a recruiter will only know that you said you could. 

The more you can complete your profile, the more people will know you.  You want a job that suits you, not one that requires you to do only the things you don’t like to do.  Use your LinkedIn Profile to showcase your interests as well as your skills.

If you find yourself polishing your resume before you have identified any open positions, use that effort on your LI Profile instead.  Sending a generic resume to job boards and openings is like making multiple copies, stuffing them in empty bottles and tossing them in the ocean in the hope that someone will rescue you.  We know that recruiters look in LinkedIn, not in the ocean.

Remember that less than 20% of jobs are filled through job postings and less than 5% by recruiters.  You do need to have a web presence on LinkedIn, but even more, you need to use it to grow your personal network and number of friends.

Book a review of your LinkedIn Profile here

 

Targeted Networking: Connecting with the right people

We had a great webinar today about Targeted Networking for your career, but I was all thumbs on the tech and it did not record properly.  So I re-recorded it and here it is for those of you who could not make an 11 am call.

You don’t need to be known by many, many people: the beekeepers of Africa and the shepherds of Mongolia probably don’t need to know your name.  But you do want to be known by the people you work with or want to work with.  You want to know them and be known to them as someone who is a member of their “tribe” and who speaks the same jargon about the problems in your field.  

But before they can know you, you have to find them and introduce yourself. You don’t want to spin your wheels with the people who are not a future “member of your tribe” if you are urgently looking for your next job.  (Of course these other people can make your life far more interesting, but not in a targeted, strategic way!)

So where can you find them?  Watch the video above or come to Open Office Hours and we can talk about it.

Please do leave your comments or questions below!

 

What do LinkedIn and romance novels set in the 18th century have in common?

18th century Redingote A Promenade 1797 - LinkedIn and romance novels

How can LinkedIn and romance novels set in the 1800’s have anything in common?

Have you read (in Jane Austin novels) how people would get all dressed up and go to the park at a certain time to “promenade”? What do LinkedIn and romance novels have in common?

It is the place to see and be seen – followed up by invitations to tea/coffee. Not much has changed – it is now simply virtual – LinkedIn is the place to see and be seen and now we drink more coffee than tea. 

LinkedIn and romance novels and 1960's promenade

Is your LinkedIn profile “all dressed up”?

Do you have all of the parts of LinkedIn filled and showing your very best “dragon-slaying stories”? Or do you just have your name, current title and employer and perhaps the last job you held?

Can we even tell if you might be interested in a job we may be looking to fill?

  • Are you using the keywords that a recruiter or hiring manager may be looking for?
  • Are you following your college so that your old college pals can find you?
  • Are you in groups that your “tribe” belongs to?     

Is your picture professional and recognizable?

First, do you have a picture on your profile?  Can we recognize you if we met at Starbucks? Do you look employable? Professional? Since LinkedIn changed where they put the picture, be sure to look straight ahead into the camera.

Can the casual viewer figure out how to get in touch with you outside of the LinkedIn protocol?

Some people feel that LinkedIn can make them too vulnerable to identity theft. But you can get around that a bit by using an email address only for LinkedIn (and perhaps Google+).  Don’t allow people to see your phone number, don’t use your middle initial, etc.  But if people can’t look you up, a resume to an online job posting won’t get you seen either.

It is not what you know,
or even who you know.

It is who knows you. 

 

Do you need someone to optimize your LinkedIn Profile? click here

Would YOU Send This Email Introduction to Someone You had NEVER Met?

LinkedIn

I participate in LinkedIn’s “email introduction” method. Do you? 

HOWEVER!  Don’t do what this person did!!!  Not only has he trashed his own reputation/brand, he has trashed mine!  Not only is the grammar bad, but the audacity of the demand is outrageous! An email introduction needs to be polite and interesting!

“I am urgently looking for job opportunity.
I am having more then 23 years of experience in Sales and Business Development.
Kindly inform further for any suitable position. I am willing to relocate.” 

(This was the entire email, not taken out of context, that I received yesterday as a CC.)

As a recruiter, I only work on a few searches at any one time. 

That means that it is unlikely that I have your job when you are looking for it.  But I do feel for the people who are looking. So I provide guidance and instruction on job search strategy.

This is a marriage proposal before the person even knows if they like you! 

No one has a warehouse of jobs waiting for you to ask for one.  It just doesn’t work that way.  And for a Sales person to do this (OMG!!!) – proof that they are NOT very good. 

The emails you send through introductions MUST be polite, deferential, interesting and prove that the person introducing you has the final reader’s best interest at heart. 

We are all extremely busy.  Opening an email from someone we don’t know is an act of kindness and curiosity.  If you are not polite and interesting, you will only annoy the recipient of your email.

I have disconnected from this person, because, no matter how generous I feel or how badly he needs a job, he will only wreck my reputation!  And I’ve apologized to the person I had introduced him to. 

If you need help with writing these email introductions drop me an email

Changing industries?

Kerry Hannon on changing industries“Changing industries? Meet people. If there’s a particular industry you’re interested in, join an association affiliated with it.  Look for volunteer opportunities in that field. Attend industry and professional meetings and conferences. Glom on to alumni groups and the career center at your alma mater where can find help with resumé polishing and smoothing your interviewing skills along with offering networking opportunities. Join LinkedIn. It’s great way to build a professional network. Employers troll it for perspective hires.” Kerry Hannon

 

Kerry has great points!

 

In addition:

 

Immerse yourself in the new industry – subscribe to trade magazines, learn as much as you can about the industry, Google it, subscribe to blogs about it, look for groups on LinkedIn, see if there are groups on Facebook, look for the Twitter hashtag, see if YouTube has any videos about it, go to a physical library and ask at the information desk, read the trade magazine there, find out which companies are in the industry in your town.

 

Is this industry at all close to the one you want to leave? The biotech development of drugs is not much different from the development of biofuels.  The auto industry has much in common with the large appliance industry (big metal box with lots of moving parts bought by consumers).  What do you know that could be of use in the new industry?

 

What are the overlapping functions?  Are you in one of them?  For example: Finance and accounting takes place in all industries and even non-profits.  Sales crosses many industries and technical sales does as well. Research may well transfer.

 

Where are you coming from and where do you want to go?  Do you have a list of skills?  Check out O-Net the latest version of the Directory of Occupational Titles that the Department of Labor puts out. Which of your skills match those used in your preferred industry?  Check out the advanced search function on O-Net.

 

There are many things to do in the world, many occupations.  What do you want yours to be?  Only you can choose.

 

What do you think?  Comment on this post!

 

 

 

 

%d bloggers like this: