iPhone, Android, iPad, or Nexus – what Apps work for you?

Today's latte, Google Play.

Today’s latte, Google Play. (Photo credit: yukop)

Back in 2012, I asked my subscribers (click here if you would like to subscribe to the newsletter) to tell me what apps they have on their smartphones and tablets.  Here are some of the responses (the programs that are no longer around are strikethrough:

Andrew de Guttadauro, expert in business development (IP, M&A in the biotech world), said, “Here are the ones that I currently favor:
Communication:  Skype (great for saving money when overseas and a wifi connection is in hand)
Organization:  Evernote & Pocket (I’m a big believer in cloud-based software and these two apps work great in tandem to allow one to clip, tag, organize, and store just about anything that comes across a computer, smart phone, tablet, or other similar device)
RSS & News Streamers:  Reeder, Flipboard, Zite, and Feedly (admittedly, this is overkill, but I’m a news and media junkie and these apps all do a wonderful job of combining my RSS feeds, and other news sources of interest, into organized news channels/feeds that are more pleasing than the underlying RSS engine – Google Reader, in my case)
Task Management:  I favor Wunderlist because, like my other apps, it’s platform-agnostic and cloud-based, so I can access my “to do’s” whenever and however I like or need (Remember the Milk is a good alternative)
Data and Info Storage:  Dropbox is great, but it’s important people realize that Dropbox isn’t especially secure as the company wants to give users the choice of security/encryption software so it’s important to use 2-step authentication plus “True Crypt” if using Drop Box to store anything even remotely sensitive
E-mail:  I use the native Apple app for Outlook but favor Google’s Gmail app to access the latter service (despite it being from Google, this app could use additional improvements).  I also recommend using Xobni if possible, to help sift through Outlook more efficiently.
News and Sports:  ESPN, Huffington Post, The Atlantic
Travel:  Kayak
Web:  Chrome’s my favored browser on all devices
– Shopping:  Amazon (via app on iPhone or via browser and website on iPad), Target app
– Dining:  Open table, Yelp (applicable in the shopping category as well)
Social Media:  LinkedIn
– Bookmarks:  X-Marks
– Media:  Amazon streaming, Netflix streaming, Hulu Plus, HBO GO

That pretty much covers the apps.  I would recommend to everyone that 2-step authentication should be used on any site where it can be enabled and that separate signups be used on any site where possible (never use Google, Facebook, or LinkedIn username/passwords to access other sites as you’re needlessly exposing yourself to sequential hacking).  Finally, I use a password management tool but do not have the app loaded on either smart phone or tablet as it makes me too antsy viz. potential loss of the device. I also don’t have bank or insurance apps loaded on my devices for the same reason and would recommend using such apps only if you don’t keep permanently signed in to either (I’d rather access such info through the added hassle of the web browser instead).

I hope this proves helpful and look forward to hearing what others are using.”

These are available in both Apple and Android.  Reeder, True Crypt, Xnobi and X-Marks are Apple-specific.

Personally, and many devices later, I have many that Andrew had and some others.  They do multiply!!

LinkedIn
Workboard
Contactually
Evernote
MailChimp
ColorNote
Drive
Dropbox
Slideshare
Startmeeting

Facebook
Outlook
Pinterest
GoToWebinar
GoToMeeting
Hangouts
Instagram
Message+
Snapchat
Twitter


Navigation (Google maps)
News & Weather (native Android)
Calendar (native Android)
Contacts (native Android)
Messenger/Messaging/Voice Message
Voice Recorder
Voice Search
Memo
Gmail and my other emails
Adobe Reader
YouTube
TED
Out of Milk (but only for grocery shopping)
an alarm clock, a stopwatch, a calculator, a music player
Kindle and Play Books
and my camera and gallery
Plus more, of course.

I’ve only linked a few of these, all the rest can be found at the app marketplaces. 

What do you have on yours?



Learning from Death

It has been a while since I posted.  I’ve been dealing with my mother-in-law’s final days, death and estate.

One of the things we all know is that life is short and everyone dies eventually.  My mother-in-law fought it off for quite some time – dying at 89, at home, with her daughter in attendance and just as she wanted to.

Are you doing what you want to with your life?  Did you pick a direction for your career that is still pleasing you and with which you can really meet your own goals for your career?

Were you a 24/7 kind of worker when you started (since that is how it was in grad school) but you have since been trying to find some sort of “work/life balance” or at least enough time to actually get a good night’s sleep?  What do you do for you?  What do you do for others?

My mother-in-law’s memorial service was a luncheon for her bowling buddies (she bowled until the the last month before she died) at their beloved Mexican restaurant.  Her network was amazingly large for a woman her age.  They all had a good time and remembered her well – a good send off.

friendly networking

Would your career networking friends come to your memorial?  What would they say?  Would there be laughter as well as tears or would people try to simply be presentable?

How do you make friends?  Do you have time for that?  It matters.

People like to work with friends and have their bosses hire them.  Sometimes it is better to be hired and then make friends, but are you making time to do that?  Are you staying in touch with former colleagues and following where they are now?

Life is short.  Make friends when you can!

Big Data Recruiting – wonderful or creepy?

Have you seen this? Coming Soon — One:Me Marketing  

Updated 3/8/2017: So now that the CIA has the power to spy on us through our TVs and cell phones, collect data on us through smartphone games, and store the info in huge databases with smart algorithms, we are even more aware of the death of privacy.  What do you think of this?    

Do you think it is wonderful (so you don’t have to be annoyed by completely irrelevant ads and you can get the ads or job opportunities you want) or creepy?

%d bloggers like this: