4 kinds of resumes

How to use 4 different kinds of documents to introduce yourself

Most people start a job search with writing resumes.  But that is the last step before the interview!

Better is to update your LinkedIn and other Profiles, then update your CV, then skip a generic resume, then write the specific resume for the companies you have researched.

You also need more casual ways to introduce yourself.

And you need to know which words to use in each of these.

What words describe and show what you can and want to do next? Do you have a list with all the synonyms?  Is it sorted by Want to Use In My Next Job to Never Want to Use Again? Don’t use the “never” words if you can help it.

Use them to write your casual stories and your dragon-slaying tales.  Use them in your Profiles and CV.

Then do the research on the companies you want to work in.  What words do they use to talk about the problems they are working on.  Do you own these words too?

If all you have is a position description and have not spoken with someone currently working on the problem they need to hire to solve, then use the words in the position description – it may help you get through the “black hole” of the applicant tracking system.

When you have notes from the conversations you have had with the person working on that company’s current problem, you have the keywords for your resume for that particular job.  You will be in front of the rest of the applicants because you “speak the same language” as the hiring manager.

4 kinds of introductory documents:

  • Profiles (LinkedIn and Associations)
  • CV
  • Generic resume
  • Specific resume for a specific company

You can get by with just the first and last and really, truly, don’t waste your time polishing up the generic one.

Need help with this? Get help here

The steps before your resume and why you need them

What is a resume?

Do you have a complete list of your skills and expertise?

your skills and keywordsWhat are you good at?  Do you have a list of all your skills?

This is not a résumé, rather it is just a private list, organized or not, of the things that you know you can do.  It can serve you as a way to build a résumé, but even more, it can keep you from getting too down on yourself in the midst of the job search.

Perhaps you might want to keep a stack of 3X5 cards in your pocket or a file on your phone where you just record each skill as it comes to you during your day.

We are all much more talented than we usually give ourselves credit for.

Do you have this list?  Not just in your head but on paper or the computer?

If you have it in a spreadsheet, you can add columns like: “Want to do this in my next job” or “I like this”. Then grade them and sort.  Now you know what skills to look for in job descriptions.

Pick a really strong skill.  How can you use this skill in your job search this week?

20 minute webcast here

Who actually has the job?

Who actually has the job? Not your buddies, or you would already have it. Not your extended family either. Do you currently know the people who need your skills?

job

noun, verb, jobbed, job·bing, adjective

noun

1.  a piece of work, especially a specific task done as part of the routine of one’s occupation or for an agreed price: She gave him the job of mowing the lawn.
2.  a post of employment; full-time or part-time position: She was seeking a job as an editor.
3.  anything a person is expected or obliged to do; duty; responsibility: It is your job to be on time.
4.  an affair, matter, occurrence, or state of affairs: to make the best of a bad job.
5.  the material, project, assignment, etc., being worked upon: The housing project was a long and costly job.
  – Dictionary.com

So who actually has the job you want?

Job postings are lists of jobs.  Recruiters do the job of finding the right person for their client.  HR does the job of bringing the desired person into the company and/or may do the job of the recruiter.  But it is the hiring manager who actually has the 1.  a piece of work, especially a specific task. 

How can you be known by the hiring manager?

For a full view and more info, click here

Are You Polishing Your Resume?

 

Are you polishing your resume?  Perhaps even “over-polishing” it?

Most people, when faced with a possible job change, spend a great deal of time and energy polishing their (single) resume.  This can be like a cancer that uses your energy and results in nothing good.

A resume is a piece of advertising, a piece of marketing collateral, designed to get you an interview at one particular company.  The same resume cannot be used at multiple companies because each company has a slightly different need, uses slightly different words and needs to be approached slightly differently.  So keep your online presence and profiles up-to-date so it is easy to produce a resume for that particular company!  Keep an ever renewing list of your current skills and the ones you want to use in your next job. Keep notes on the companies you want to work in so you can track their “jargon” and needs.

You will need a new, 2 page resume for every job you apply for.

Need some help?  Here is a podcast with more information

Or consider 30 minutes of private coaching

Ten Secrets of a Successful Résumé

resumesGuest Blog by Pam Condie

 

The most important thing to keep in mind when building a résumé is its purpose:  answering the employer’s need for you to solve a problem he/she has that can’t be solved with his/her current staff.  That is the employer’s only interest in you.  Focus your résumé to answer his/her question.  That is what will get your foot in the door for a job interview.

  1.  Make your résumé long enough to tell your story but tell it succinctly.  There is a myth out in the ether that a résumé will not be read if it is longer than one page.  Wrong!  I have seen many résumés that had the life edited out of them because they were squeezed into a single page of small print – not appealing to the hiring manager.
  2.  When I worked in human resources I often found that hiring was a messy, frequently changing process.  Cover letters and résumés could get separated, particularly if we had received many responses to a job opening.  Be certain that all pages of your résumé as well as your cover letter have your name and contact information in the footer of each page.  At the bottom of your first page write “continued on next page” if you have a second page.   Otherwise the reader will not know if you have finished writing or if he/she should look around for a missing second page.
  3.  As they teach in accounting classes, “Check your work, check it and check it again.” Check for spelling and English errors.  A careless error can turn a reader off and damage your credibility as someone who pays attention to details.  Don’t depend on a software spelling feature to catch all mistakes.  The engineer who wrote the program was most likely not an English major.
  4.  Most human beings are lazy readers.  Be kind to them.  Make your font 11 or 12 point.  Smaller fonts are harder on the eyes.  Larger looks amateurish.
  5.  Times Roman is the most popular font in the US and allows more information per square inch than most others.  Pick it or one that is neither unusual nor fussy looking.  Keep things simple.
  6.  Since most people resist reading, especially reading long sentences and paragraphs, divide your résumé into smaller batches of information to invite the reader in.
  7.  The objective is the first piece of information at the top of the first page. A clear objective helps the human resources department track your document more easily.  It answers the employer’s question, “What do you want from me?”  Keep the objective brief, to the point and possibly slightly broad, i.e., “Director of Sales.” Keep in mind that you have an electronic copy of your résumé and can tweak the objective if you need to for other job openings.   (Connie disagrees with the use of objectives and feels you should have 3-5 bullet points that show the things that you can do, and like to do, that the employer needs for this job. Louise Goeckel, Let’s Go Forward.biz, suggests a headline like “Director of Sales known for _________ with talent in ________.”)
  8.  The first third of your first page is the most valuable real estate on your résumé.  The latest study shows that recruiters spend a maximum of six seconds screening your résumé for further review. State your case there in a career summary, the snapshot of your career.
  9.  Unless you are in the field of education, medicine or diplomacy or you are a new graduate, your education goes near the end of your résumé. If you had a college minor subject or a scholarship or an academic honor, do include it.
  10.  Community activities are nice to include at the end of the résumé. They demonstrate industry and the physical and mental energy for a balanced life. Be careful of mentioning activities with controversial groups here.  You never know where people’s prejudices lie in spite of what they say. (Connie disagrees.  Only include if you KNOW that the hiring manager does the same thing.)

 

Pam Condie is a former HR person and a Certified Professional Resume Writer who works with people from all industries to clarify and write their next resume.  She can be reached at www.pamcondieresumes.com

Why is it so hard to find a job?

Why is it so hard to find a job? The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics  shows us that the unemployment rate for people with a professional degree or a PhD is less than 3% which is statistically 0%. 

Why is it so hard to find a job

 

So why is it so hard to find a job, even though the economy is better than it was? Especially for fresh inexperienced graduates and well-experienced Boomers?  What is holding you back? Or tripping you up?

Many people think that you find a job like you order a book on Amazon – go online and find the one that looks interesting, click and attach your CV and wait for “the call”. Or they think that holding one of those degrees above is the “E” ticket to a good job and being chased by headhunters and HR people. It is really depressing to find out that it isn’t so.

So what is the way?  The above method is very broken.  But you can still find the right job.

You have learned hard topics, like neurobiology and brain surgery.  Job search skills are not nearly as difficult, but must still be respected, thought through and employed. 

What skills do you think you don’t have or are missing that should make it easier? Are they lab or bioscience skills?  Or are they job search skills? Can you list your job search skills the way you can your science skills?  

Bonus tip: Learning the skills of job search is easy but there is quite a bit of misinformation or outdated methods still being taught online.  

 

If you need some personal help, just book a time to talk here

 

Or How to Fail at Job Search

How NOT to approach a recruiter – a rant

 Ask Rant

How NOT to approch a recruiter – What you should NOT say.

This is how NOT to approach a recruiter: every so often I get an email that says “Dear Recruiter, Here is the link to my Profile/resume.  Find me a job. From (name)”* (from a construction person from India as I discovered when I looked him up)  or “I am back on the market. Let me know if you have a search going on that matches my background”* from a programmer.

How rude!  No please or thank you, even. And no notion of what sort of jobs I fill. 

How lazy!  No introduction, nothing about even what industry they are in, nothing about what they really want, nothing about what their next job possibly would be titled.

But even the polite ones within the industries I work in can be off-putting, “thanks for accepting my linked in connection request and I am desperately looking for a suitable position in California area in Biotech & Pharmaceutical field. Please let me know if can expect some help from you in my job search.”*  And spelling counts.

How arrogant!  What makes them the gods’ gift to me or my clients? 

I am a person, not an online catalog of jobs; I don’t have a connection to every job in every industry and company in the world.   Please treat me as a person and use the manners your mother taught you.  Please and thank you really are the “magic words”; no one is too good to use them.

I cannot read your mind and I am very busy. 

Make it easy for me.  Introduce yourself: your name, your last title or “what you do”, your industry, your preferred “niche” and geography, but briefly.  How would you introduce yourself to me at a party at your cousin’s?  Ask about what sort of jobs I fill – for instance, I never fill programmer roles, but I do fill biologist jobs.  I don’t usually fill construction roles (although I have in the past).  I do fill roles for scientists, managers, clinical trials, marketing, translational medicine, etc. Very specific roles with very specific skill sets.

If all of these things match (your industry, skills, etc. and my industries and niche), then we can move to the next step, developing a connection and relationship.

Some recruiters with a very specific niche keep a “stable” of candidates and move them from job to job.  These are the people with whom they have established a good, solid, relationship.  Most of us have a broader niche and don’t expect to place you more than once or perhaps twice.

Some (perhaps most) recruiters rarely have the same search twice

Really great people with whom they have established a relationship will not likely be needed for the particular job that the recruiter is currently working on.  However, such a search may start tomorrow. 

You see, recruiters don’t actually have the jobs or the pain of an unfilled job. Recruiters have “job orders” or “searches”.  The hiring managers and their teams are the ones who are hurting because the job is unfilled, no one has the specific skills needed and someone is missing from the team. Recruiters get a job order about the time that the job is posted but after the hiring manager has asked his staff if they know anyone to fill it.

So what are recruiters to you? If you would like to begin a relationship with me, please do email me at connie@hamptonexecutivesearch.com or connie@biosciencejobkit.com?

To learn what works best for a bioscience job search, click here

*actually received email and LinkedIn messages.

Immediate Next Bioscience Job Search Steps

Bruce Douganby Guest Blogger
Bruce W. Dougan, SPHR

So, you just got the news….

You along with millions of other Americans have just received the news that you are no longer needed at your place of employment.  Call it a lay off, call it downsizing, call it termination of employment…the result is the same – you are unemployed and you need to start your job search.

How you handle the news and what you do immediately will set the stage for the next “chapter in your career.”  I am only going to cover the initial steps to take to “get going.”

Learn from the old role,
Determine the story,
Refresh your network, then
Start the job search

The first step is to take some time to quietly reflect on your past role; What went really well? What did you learn from the role and from your co-workers? What were your Key Accomplishments? Do these first, as we seldom remember the good things.  Only when this list is exhausted, should you write down the improvement/opportunity items.  The purpose is not to lay blame or assign fault, but rather to really search deep inside to position yourself for your new role.

We are not writing your resume nor writing the great American novel here, but simply you need to be clear in your mind what your accomplishments were in your role, why they are important, and why you left this role and are searching for a new role.  Everyone will ask these questions and you need to be prepared; friends and family will want to know how you are doing and what you are going to do next, recruiters will definitely ask why you left and this is great practice for your 30 second elevator speech. So determine the story you are going to tell and move forward.

You likely have neglected your network while you have been working… We all do, the job is your focus and your network is secondary. Now it is time to focus on your network.  Dust off the lists you already have; friends, family, school contacts, LinkedIn, Facebook, recruiting firms, charitable groups, etc.  Don’t send out anything, just update the list and make sure the information is correct.  Now with a newly refreshed networking list, send out your first note using a format that includes some background, what help looks like, and how you can help each other.  Remember, you are NOT asking for a job, you are looking for more contacts that will lead you to a new role.

Now it’s time to actually start your job search.  There are absolutely tons of resources on how to conduct a successful job search.  I’ll leave that up to the experts, but by immediately (at least within the first week) completing the first three steps (learn, story, refresh) you are ready to begin with a positive attitude, knowledge of what was successful during your last role and a great networking list.

Good luck.
by Guest Blogger
Bruce W. Dougan, SPHR
Group50 Consulting
513-508-0351
BWDougan@gmail.com
http://www.linkedin.com/in/brucedougan/

 

Want an Unbeatable Résumé? Read These Tips from a Top Recruiter. – Forbes

Want an Unbeatable Résumé? Read These Tips from a Top Recruiter. – Forbes.

Kerry HannonKerry-Hannon_avatar_1452180055-400x400, Contributor at Forbes, has written an excellent article on resumes and job search in general.  I highly recommend reading this.

What do you think?

Remember that a resume is not really about you – it is about how you can solve the problem/need that the company has.

If you need some one-on-one help with this, book a time here.

 

Most open positions are filled through personal networking

Personal Networking works the best for finding jobs.

Personal Networking works the best for finding jobs.

#1:  Most open positions are filled through personal networking.

Job-Postings2

Only 20% (at the most, quite possibly closer to 10%) of jobs are filled through postings on job sites or company websites.

And … HR really doesn’t have the time to sort through all the resumes of people who just want a job, any job.  Please do NOT send your resume to a company just because you want to work there when you don’t have the right skills for the job they have posted.  There simply is not enough time in the day for an HR person to really read resumes and put yours aside for a role that has not opened.

More than 50% of jobs (and perhaps as much as 85%) are filled through a direct connection with someone in the company that eventually hires you.  Employee referrals and offline (face to face) networking fill at least 45%.

So where does that leave you? 

You have to be the one to initiate the contacts.  And you need to be strategic about it.

It’s not what you know, it’s who you know – NOT

Also … just like you can’t eat an elephant in one bite, so you need to divide up and prioritize your search, target your networking in a way that makes sense to you to be hired for the position you want.

targeted networking

revised 4/18/17

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