Make it easy for people to get in touch with you about jobs

Make it easy for people to get in touch with you. 

How easy is it for people not currently in your network to get in touch with you?

Social Network concept in 3d

How can recruiters and hiring managers get in touch with you? You might want to have an email address just for your job search.  I recommend a gmail account.

It is your “loose connections” or your distant ones that will be most likely to have your next job for you.  Don’t network with recruiters – we will find you if we have a job you seem to fit, but do network with people at the companies you want to work in.  Maintain your connections, say “Happy Birthday” or Congratulations on work anniversary, promotion or new job!  And keep adding to the network.  Your limit is 30,000!

Here is what you have to do on LinkedIn to allow recruiters and hiring managers to email you directly.

Go to your picture in the upper right hand corner (in the black bar)

Hover and click on Settings and Privacy

Go to the Privacy Tab

Click on “Who can see your email address”

And change it to Everyone or at least 1st and 2nd-degree connections 

If you don’t want the emails from anyone, change it to Only you

But why do that?  What are you on LinkedIn for? 

 

Who can see connie@hamptonexecutivesearch.com on your profile?

  • Only you
  • 1st-degree connections
  • 1st and 2nd-degree connections
  • Everyone on LinkedIn

You can control what email address is your primary in your email settings and learn more about how your email address is visible to other members on LinkedIn.

Need some help with your LinkedIn Profile?  Click here

Is Your LinkedIn Profile a Dud?

Visible online so hiring managers and recruiters can find you

How to build and develop your LinkedIn Profile

Be Visible

No one can hire you if they don’t know you exist!! So be visible!!!

Once upon a time, you could get a good job by walking into the company and asking the receptionist for an application.  She probably knew your father or at least her boss did. You were visible to your neighbors and your parents’ friends.

Now we live in a world where you don’t know everyone and everyone does not know you.  So you have to do a few things to be visible.  And I don’t mean pink hair (although that will not stop you in most jobs any more).

So fill out your LinkedIn Profile!  Get a checklist for doing so here

And look for other places on the internet where you have some unused property: G+, Twitter, your trade associations, like RAPS or others.  Are you presenting yourself in a professional and attractive (to hiring managers) way.

If you need some help with this, Click here

Target Your Message and Your Job Search

4 kinds of resumes

Have you been sold a bill of good?

Do you have an interview suit?

Do you have an interview suit?  It doesn’t do much good hanging in your closet.

A LinkedIn Profile is like your interview suit – it shows what you want a potential employer to see about you.  It is (or should be) much more comprehensive than a resume (an ad for an interview about how you can solve that hiring manager’s problem).  And it needs to be filled with the words that convey your abilities, expertise, skills, etc.  In real English language sentences that talk about the problem you were hired to solve, what you did and the consequences of your actions.

These treasure words need to be in your headline as well – not merely the last title some company gave you.  But the answer to the question, “Who is Your Name?”  Ah, yes, she is the one who…….

Your profile needs to be updated every year, even if you are not looking for a job this year.  But it is now 2018.  Do you want your current job forever?

If I can be of any help to you, please do book a call to talk

 

networking, follow up and email (signatures.)

 

Bioscience Job Search Steps

What is a resume?

Your Resume is NOT About You

Do You Use These Alternatives to Your Resume?

Do You REALLY Need a Resume for EVERY Job???

How to build and develop your LinkedIn Profile

Your LinkedIn Profile

How to build and develop your LinkedIn profile

How to build and develop your LinkedIn Profile.  It is necessary that you be visible online.  LinkedIn is the premier professional site, but you probably have others – trade associations, G+, etc.  Post there as well!

The job seeker’s tasks are:

To be visible online, known to the people in the companies you want to work for, remembered before they hire someone else, liked and trusted to solve their problem.

The podcast is above but if you would like to see the webcast, click here

For more help, check out the products and programs offered in the menu or email me at connie@biosciencejobkit.com

Why Dragon-Slaying Stories?

Is Your LinkedIn Profile a Dud?

How Recruiters use Your LinkedIn Profile to Screen People Out or In

Do You Want to Be Found by Recruiters and Hiring Managers?

Do You Know Your Industry and Where Your Next Job Might Be?

What industry are you in or want to be in?
How well do you know it?


Knowledge workers like bioscience professionals are expected to know their industry, what is going on in it and who the main “players” are. 

Do you know how to decide?  Where to look? Who at each company to talk with for more info?

industry

I talk about this in more detail on the 2nd Wednesday each month at my free, open office hours.  Click here to join us!

Ways of Using LinkedIn in your Job Search

LinkedIn in your job search

Image via Wikipedia

LinkedIn is a really important tool for your job search.

Of course you have completely filled out your profile on LinkedIn, yes?  And not simply posted a generic resume.  Instead, you have written about the skills you enjoy using and what you have done with them.  You have filled it out as completely as possible and also posted a good picture of you, smiling.

While you are on your profile site, click on the “number of people who have viewed your profile in the last 3 days” button on the right hand side. Do this daily.

These are your first and second degree connections by name and anonymous if more distantly connected.  You can connect with your second degree viewers in many ways – directly, through a first degree connection (check on the viewers profile), through a group you both belong to (you do belong to appropriate groups, yes?), or through the use of Inmail.

Thank them for looking at your profile.

Ask them what you can do for them today.  Interact! Network!  It doesn’t take much time at all!

You need at least 400 people in your LinkedIn Connections to really make this work for you. Most need to be people in your niche, not recruiters, or even your college roommates if they are not in your industry.

“Business friends” are the ones you will work for, find jobs for and who will find jobs for you.  Who are yours?  Do you have a list on your computer?  Do you contact them regularly, even when you are NOT looking for a job?

LinkedIn in your job search is not the only tool.

Your email and social media are important as well.  The phone is too.  Do you know how to use them, long before you write a resume?

Need some help figuring out who they should be or how to keep in contact with them?  Book a coaching call here.  ($125/30 minutes)

SECRET #2: Strategic Networking

 

Networking ad 3SECRET #2:  Strategic Networking

So what is strategic networking?  It is not handing out your personal card at every party or event, nor is it just getting on LinkedIn, etc.

Strategic networking is using your time in a targeted manner to connect with the people who will be your career network for the rest of your career.

To be strategic you need to know a few things:

What exactly do you want to do in your next job? – write it down!

Where exactly do you want to work? – locally or can you move?

What companies are in that locale?

Which ones do you think are interesting and would need your skills?  Costco doesn’t hire biotech scientists.

Who do you know who works at each one?  Not the hiring manager and not the person who is trying to do your job and his own.

The people you need to network with first are the ones who can give you the inside scoop about the company.

Immediate Next Bioscience Job Search Steps

Bruce Douganby Guest Blogger
Bruce W. Dougan, SPHR

So, you just got the news….

You along with millions of other Americans have just received the news that you are no longer needed at your place of employment.  Call it a lay off, call it downsizing, call it termination of employment…the result is the same – you are unemployed and you need to start your job search.

How you handle the news and what you do immediately will set the stage for the next “chapter in your career.”  I am only going to cover the initial steps to take to “get going.”

Learn from the old role,
Determine the story,
Refresh your network, then
Start the job search

The first step is to take some time to quietly reflect on your past role; What went really well? What did you learn from the role and from your co-workers? What were your Key Accomplishments? Do these first, as we seldom remember the good things.  Only when this list is exhausted, should you write down the improvement/opportunity items.  The purpose is not to lay blame or assign fault, but rather to really search deep inside to position yourself for your new role.

We are not writing your resume nor writing the great American novel here, but simply you need to be clear in your mind what your accomplishments were in your role, why they are important, and why you left this role and are searching for a new role.  Everyone will ask these questions and you need to be prepared; friends and family will want to know how you are doing and what you are going to do next, recruiters will definitely ask why you left and this is great practice for your 30 second elevator speech. So determine the story you are going to tell and move forward.

You likely have neglected your network while you have been working… We all do, the job is your focus and your network is secondary. Now it is time to focus on your network.  Dust off the lists you already have; friends, family, school contacts, LinkedIn, Facebook, recruiting firms, charitable groups, etc.  Don’t send out anything, just update the list and make sure the information is correct.  Now with a newly refreshed networking list, send out your first note using a format that includes some background, what help looks like, and how you can help each other.  Remember, you are NOT asking for a job, you are looking for more contacts that will lead you to a new role.

Now it’s time to actually start your job search.  There are absolutely tons of resources on how to conduct a successful job search.  I’ll leave that up to the experts, but by immediately (at least within the first week) completing the first three steps (learn, story, refresh) you are ready to begin with a positive attitude, knowledge of what was successful during your last role and a great networking list.

Good luck.
by Guest Blogger
Bruce W. Dougan, SPHR
Group50 Consulting
513-508-0351
BWDougan@gmail.com
http://www.linkedin.com/in/brucedougan/

 

iPhone, Android, iPad, or Nexus – what Apps work for you?

Today's latte, Google Play.

Today’s latte, Google Play. (Photo credit: yukop)

Back in 2012, I asked my subscribers (click here if you would like to subscribe to the newsletter) to tell me what apps they have on their smartphones and tablets.  Here are some of the responses (the programs that are no longer around are strikethrough:

Andrew de Guttadauro, expert in business development (IP, M&A in the biotech world), said, “Here are the ones that I currently favor:
Communication:  Skype (great for saving money when overseas and a wifi connection is in hand)
Organization:  Evernote & Pocket (I’m a big believer in cloud-based software and these two apps work great in tandem to allow one to clip, tag, organize, and store just about anything that comes across a computer, smart phone, tablet, or other similar device)
RSS & News Streamers:  Reeder, Flipboard, Zite, and Feedly (admittedly, this is overkill, but I’m a news and media junkie and these apps all do a wonderful job of combining my RSS feeds, and other news sources of interest, into organized news channels/feeds that are more pleasing than the underlying RSS engine – Google Reader, in my case)
Task Management:  I favor Wunderlist because, like my other apps, it’s platform-agnostic and cloud-based, so I can access my “to do’s” whenever and however I like or need (Remember the Milk is a good alternative)
Data and Info Storage:  Dropbox is great, but it’s important people realize that Dropbox isn’t especially secure as the company wants to give users the choice of security/encryption software so it’s important to use 2-step authentication plus “True Crypt” if using Drop Box to store anything even remotely sensitive
E-mail:  I use the native Apple app for Outlook but favor Google’s Gmail app to access the latter service (despite it being from Google, this app could use additional improvements).  I also recommend using Xobni if possible, to help sift through Outlook more efficiently.
News and Sports:  ESPN, Huffington Post, The Atlantic
Travel:  Kayak
Web:  Chrome’s my favored browser on all devices
– Shopping:  Amazon (via app on iPhone or via browser and website on iPad), Target app
– Dining:  Open table, Yelp (applicable in the shopping category as well)
Social Media:  LinkedIn
– Bookmarks:  X-Marks
– Media:  Amazon streaming, Netflix streaming, Hulu Plus, HBO GO

That pretty much covers the apps.  I would recommend to everyone that 2-step authentication should be used on any site where it can be enabled and that separate signups be used on any site where possible (never use Google, Facebook, or LinkedIn username/passwords to access other sites as you’re needlessly exposing yourself to sequential hacking).  Finally, I use a password management tool but do not have the app loaded on either smart phone or tablet as it makes me too antsy viz. potential loss of the device. I also don’t have bank or insurance apps loaded on my devices for the same reason and would recommend using such apps only if you don’t keep permanently signed in to either (I’d rather access such info through the added hassle of the web browser instead).

I hope this proves helpful and look forward to hearing what others are using.”

These are available in both Apple and Android.  Reeder, True Crypt, Xnobi and X-Marks are Apple-specific.

Personally, and many devices later, I have many that Andrew had and some others.  They do multiply!!

LinkedIn
Workboard
Contactually
Evernote
MailChimp
ColorNote
Drive
Dropbox
Slideshare
Startmeeting

Facebook
Outlook
Pinterest
GoToWebinar
GoToMeeting
Hangouts
Instagram
Message+
Snapchat
Twitter


Navigation (Google maps)
News & Weather (native Android)
Calendar (native Android)
Contacts (native Android)
Messenger/Messaging/Voice Message
Voice Recorder
Voice Search
Memo
Gmail and my other emails
Adobe Reader
YouTube
TED
Out of Milk (but only for grocery shopping)
an alarm clock, a stopwatch, a calculator, a music player
Kindle and Play Books
and my camera and gallery
Plus more, of course.

I’ve only linked a few of these, all the rest can be found at the app marketplaces. 

What do you have on yours?



A recruiter works, by definition, for the hiring company

Job search  A recruiter works, by definition, for the hiring company as that is who pays them

Most recruiters don’t have time to work with candidates and a candidate really can’t “hire a recruiter”.  You can hire a coach and you can work with an agency.  But it has been illegal for an agency to charge you for “finding you a job”, especially if they don’t fulfill that promise. 

I cannot bring myself to simply ignore really great people with excellent skill sets for whom I don’t currently have a potential role, nor those who “came in second” for jobs I do have.  So I have been “giving advice” or casually coaching these people for years.  I started writing this blog and sending out a free newsletter.  Now I’m teaching classes in how to manage your own career, find jobs through your network and really maintain your career network.  I’d love to have you join me.  

You can get more information about the free class and sign up here

I’ll post more about the paid classes if I get enough interest.  Tell me you are interested by signing up for the free class or emailing me at connie@biosciencejobkit.com

For a free initial job search strategy coaching call, please do schedule a call here.

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