Do you think that you will ever need to find a new job?

Do you think that you will ever need to find a new job?

Do you know how to do it?

Are you doing the right things now
to make finding that job easier when the time comes?

Job search frustrations https://biosciencejobkit.com/recruiter-or-applying-online/

It can take up to 50 hours/week for 4-6 weeks to find a new job.  Of course, it will take longer if you are still working and can only spend 20 hrs/week.  And even longer if you have not kept up with your career network.

Your first task as a job seeker is maintaining your visibility online (LinkedIn, etc.) using the right words in the right sentences to fit the searches of recruiters AND to add depth and complexity when the hiring manager looks you up.

Then you need to be sure that you are known by the right people in the right companies. This is the most important part, but which companies are the right ones?  You have to know what would make a company right for you: size, location, culture, what they are working on, etc.  You won’t be able to find all of this online. 

You need someone inside the company who can tell you.  Do you already have this person in your career network?  Take them out to coffee!  Don’t hand them a resume – this is not a job interview!  Ask easy questions, opinions, feelings, etc.  Imagine yourself working in that environment. 

If this company seems to fit, get introduced to someone in the department you want to work in or check your career network for a potential colleague, not the boss.  Find out what problems the team is working on and how they talk about them.  Take notes.  Do NOT ask for a job – no begging.

Ensure that you will be remembered before they hire someone else, liked and trusted to be able to solve their problem(s).  This is all in the follow-up.

Now you can write a resume and will be interviewed. 

These are not difficult tasks.  But you need to do them.  The networking piece can be done well before you need a job.  Just keep in touch with the people in the companies you have decided would be good for you. 

Need more help?  Email me at connie@biosciencejobkit.com

Have you been sold a bill of good?

A bill of goods is an expression that says that the seller is not delivering what the payer thought. Are you being “had”?

I think that the “online job boards” are just such a “bill of goods”.  They are obviously making money – TV and radio ads are not free.  But only 20% of jobs are filled that way and only about 2% of applicants even get to talk to a live human (probably in HR, not the hiring manager).  So is it worth your time?  Even more, is it worth the depression you are exposing yourself to, by sending in 100s of applications/resumes and never hearing back?

What works better is to be known, remembered, liked and trusted by the people in the departments in the companies you know you want to work in.  Don’t leave your career up to chance!  Don’t wait for the Fairy Job Mother!  Get out there and meet people!  Have conversations with people in the company you want to join!  Find out if they have a problem that you want to solve!  Don’t waste your time applying to companies that are laying off, have problems you never want to see again, or are about to go under!  Find out first from the people!

Make friends with your potential co-workers so they can recommend you to the hiring manager – 75% of jobs get filled that way!  And 100% of the applicants have talked to someone in the department!

Don't wait for chance

How to build and develop your LinkedIn Profile

Your LinkedIn Profile

How to build and develop your LinkedIn profile

How to build and develop your LinkedIn Profile.  It is necessary that you be visible online.  LinkedIn is the premier professional site, but you probably have others – trade associations, G+, etc.  Post there as well!

The job seeker’s tasks are:

To be visible online, known to the people in the companies you want to work for, remembered before they hire someone else, liked and trusted to solve their problem.

The podcast is above but if you would like to see the webcast, click here

For more help, check out the products and programs offered in the menu or email me at connie@biosciencejobkit.com

Why Dragon-Slaying Stories?

Is Your LinkedIn Profile a Dud?

How Recruiters use Your LinkedIn Profile to Screen People Out or In

Do You Want to Be Found by Recruiters and Hiring Managers?

Do you know how many kinds of interviews there are?

This Friday Judson and I discussed kinds of interviews.  The first of 2 parts, this one covered prep, types of interviews (8!), confidence and questions you should ask them!  The next will cover negotiation and follow-up. This podcast is 30 minutes long.

Interviewing is not an exam or a dissertation presentation.  It is a conversation to see if you have the skills (and desire) to solve this company’s problem.  They don’t hire if they don’t have a problem.  You need to know ahead of time what that problem is.

How do you prep for your interviews?

Job search is scary and depressing and you need to get over it

How Can I Customize My Bioscience Online Job Search

Hi I’m Connie Hampton of Hampton and Associates, Scientific and Executive Search Services.  One of our services is Bioscience Job Kit.

Today’s topic is how to customize online job search.

I don’t recommend an entirely online job search but there are some things you can do to customize it and make it better. You can get a little closer to what it is you want.

Know your bioscience industry:
identify which bioscience industry or function fits you best.  When people come to me and say “I want a job, any job” you really need to know that there are no any jobs. Jobs are specific; companies are specific; industries are specific. So get started with the easy one: which industry or function fits you best? If you’re a microbiology scientist, that will tell you not to look at Macy’s.

You need to know what it is you’re selling. We all have many skills we don’t want to get paid for: cleaning refrigerators is mine. So make a list of your key skills and all the ways that those particular skills are described in your industry.

Be sure to be visible with these keywords. Use them in all of your online profiles: LinkedIn, of course, but also anything where you have a username and password will probably have a profile. Using them there! You might as well come up more frequently on Google and the search engines! Also, use them as hashtags. LinkedIn has decided to participate in the hashtag world. Use them on your twitter accounts! Go find people that use these hashtags. Go find groups that use them and join those groups.

Know your company criteria. This is one that most people already do know how to do, but let’s get really granular. Make a list of what you actually need in your next company. It could be location; it could be therapeutic area; it could be size of company; it could be funding; it could be their current relationship with the FDA. What’s your list of company criteria? I have a free downloadable initial list about bioscience company criteria, but make your own list!

Know which companies actually meet those criteria. Go online to Google or LinkedIn to find these companies. If you’ve decided you don’t want to move there is absolutely no point in including companies in Australia, in less you live in Australia. Start making your list of all those companies that seem to meet most of your criteria.

You are not going to be able to get down intimately into the companies with your online search, so that’s why the next question is who do you know who works in each of these companies. Using LinkedIn, your other groups, or just your friends identify one person in each of your companies. This person cannot give you a job. The only person who can really is the hiring manager. You don’t want to go there yet because you still need the inside scoop on the rest of your company criteria to help you narrow down that list of companies (probably 30 or more) down to the 10 that are most attractive, meet more of your criteria and that you can identify.

Do you have a friend there already? Take them out to coffee and pick their brains! Is it really a good company to work for? Or are they thinking about jumping ship? If you don’t currently have a friend there yet, get introduced! Find the person who is linked to your friend as well is your friend is linked to you. Take them both the coffee. LinkedIn helps with this. They’ll tell you who your first-degree connection is and who is their 1st degree connection (your second). You can get introduced!

Then network: provide these people, that you’re having coffee with, something they need and find out if it’s good to work for their company. Ask about the other pieces on your criteria list that you could not find online.

Working with my bioscience job search coach on my bioscience online job search

Working with my bioscience job search coach on my bioscience online job search

Ask your new networking partner at that particular company to introduce you to someone in the department you want to join. Because you can’t just expect HR to be able to identify where you would fit best. It’s not their job and you need to know which departments would be most effective for you, where you would be most effective.

When you meet with this second person, get the inside scoop on what problem they’re working on and the language they use to describe it. They may be working on a problem you have no desire to work on or one that excites you. The words they use will become very important when you write up your resume.

Your next task is to be remembered, liked, and trusted. So you need to follow up regularly to be remembered, liked, and trusted. You can do it on LinkedIn; you can do it on email; you can do it with paper and a stamp but follow-up! Send them links to things they might be interested in, “saw this and thought of you” kinds of emails, “I was looking up your problem the other day at in PubMed and found this paper. It is it out of date. Does it have anything useful for you?” Those kinds of things.

Check the companies career page daily to see if they are looking for you now. If you don’t match at least 85% of the online position description, don’t apply. It’s not your job. When you do apply online you need to use the words that are in the position description, as well as the words that you’ve discovered they used to talk about their problem because there is frequently a drop of information between the hiring manager, the HR person, and the job post. So use both so that you can get through the applicant tracking system program as well as catch the eye of the hiring manager.

Now you want to write a resume, possibly before you apply online, but definitely after you have found out what words they’re using. You want to write a resume for this company, this problem, this position.

What you do with it: only send it to that one bioscience company. It’s not applicable to other companies. Do not spam 30 companies with a resume that is generic. They’re not going to look at it. You want your information to fall off the top half of the first page of your two-page resume using the words they used to talk about their problem and showing that you can in fact solve it.

For more information check out biosciencejobkit.com or for schedule a free 15 minute coaching session or email me Connie@biosciencejobkit.com

Of course these steps work for other industries as well.

Thanks so much and have a great day!

Other links:

Where are you in your job search?

Why is it so hard to find a job?

Which is better? A recruiter or applying online?

How to Fail at Job Search

Do you fail at job search?

When you fail at job search can be depressing.  Waiting for the Fairy Job Mother doesn’t work and sending your resume to 200 jobs online is a recipe for clinical depression!

Join Judson Walsh, of Lee Hecht Harrison and I, Connie Hampton, for a 30 minute podcast on how to take control of your job search and not be dependent on the uncontrolled or uncontrollable parts of your job search. 

Most jobs (50-75% of them) never make it to the internet or to a recruiter.  

The chances of making it through the online application process are about 2 in 100.  And recruiters don’t know every job out there or what it is you really want.

So what is a job seeker to do?

  1. Know what you want and what companies are most likely to employ people to do that.
  2. Be known to the people in the departments you want to work in and the hiring managers.
  3. Be Top of Mind (otherwise known as a regular program of follow up!)
  4. Be Liked and Trusted to solve their problem.

Do your homework!  Outsourcing your job search to anyone else will slow down the process, cost you more in time and money and not guarantee a thing!!

Want to discuss it?

https://www.timetrade.com/book/GMKGM

Book a call now!

 

 

Which is better? A recruiter or applying online?

Which is better?  

“Using” a bioscience recruiter or applying to the bioscience job online?

some of the many job boards, not all have bioscience jobs

The recipe for clinical depression in the bioscience world

I was asked this by a bioscience job seeker who had just spent a considerable amount of time “updating” his CV, but did not know which companies he should be applying to.

Read this blog and you will find that I teach something completely different:

Job boards and “career pages” fill 20% of the jobs out there, but your personal chances of getting even a phone screen are down around 2%. That is a recipe for clinical depression!

Recruiters work for the companies, so if they don’t have the job you are qualified for, they don’t have a job for you and trying to get our attention will really only irritate us and, therefore, you.

 

targeted networking

Recruiters are not Talent Agents.  We don’t pick a player and shop him around to the various teams working to get him the best deal, like a “hot” athlete.  (Or if we were to consider it, you had better be cash on the hoof – better than everyone else out there and within commute distance of the company paying for the search.)

I’m sorry that this is the harsh reality.

75% or more of all jobs, high or lowly, are filled, not by what you know, not even by who you know, but by who knows you.

Here is a short podcast about this.

For more actionable steps to design your targeted networking strategy, Book a Call Here!

Ways of Using LinkedIn in your Job Search

LinkedIn in your job search

Image via Wikipedia

LinkedIn is a really important tool for your job search.

Of course you have completely filled out your profile on LinkedIn, yes?  And not simply posted a generic resume.  Instead, you have written about the skills you enjoy using and what you have done with them.  You have filled it out as completely as possible and also posted a good picture of you, smiling.

While you are on your profile site, click on the “number of people who have viewed your profile in the last 3 days” button on the right hand side. Do this daily.

These are your first and second degree connections by name and anonymous if more distantly connected.  You can connect with your second degree viewers in many ways – directly, through a first degree connection (check on the viewers profile), through a group you both belong to (you do belong to appropriate groups, yes?), or through the use of Inmail.

Thank them for looking at your profile.

Ask them what you can do for them today.  Interact! Network!  It doesn’t take much time at all!

You need at least 400 people in your LinkedIn Connections to really make this work for you. Most need to be people in your niche, not recruiters, or even your college roommates if they are not in your industry.

“Business friends” are the ones you will work for, find jobs for and who will find jobs for you.  Who are yours?  Do you have a list on your computer?  Do you contact them regularly, even when you are NOT looking for a job?

LinkedIn in your job search is not the only tool.

Your email and social media are important as well.  The phone is too.  Do you know how to use them, long before you write a resume?

Need some help figuring out who they should be or how to keep in contact with them?  Book a coaching call here.  ($125/30 minutes)

17 again

Ted Geisel (Dr. Seuss) half-length portrait, s...

Image via Wikipedia

Every age you ever were is still inside of you.

Job search can put you right back to 17 again. When you had basically no skills (or very few) and there really were thousands of people just like you.

But you are no longer 17.  You have paid your dues and have gained skills and had experiences that make you unique.

“Today you are You, that is truer than true. There is no one alive who is Youer than You.”
Dr. Seuss

You need to know what these things are.  Getting a job is a sales job – you only have to make one sale, not hundreds.  What are your “features and benefits” for the company you want to work in?  Remember that no company hires if they don’t have a problem.  And they only hire when the people they are already paying can’t solve the problem.  So what is your “Unique Selling Proposition” for each company you want to join?  What makes you you?

You have hundreds of skills.  Some you never want to use again.  Some you “own”. Some you know that you are not quite completely confident in. Make a list!  Grade them!  Choose to search for a job that uses your competencies and gives you the opportunity to increase your skills. It is out there!

If you need help with this, schedule a coaching session with me and let’s make it happen! $125/30 minutes

How I Wish I Were The Fairy Job Mother Who Could Simply Grant Wishes!

 

How to Fail at Job Search

Do you have a complete list of your skills and expertise?

your skills and keywordsWhat are you good at?  Do you have a list of all your skills?

This is not a résumé, rather it is just a private list, organized or not, of the things that you know you can do.  It can serve you as a way to build a résumé, but even more, it can keep you from getting too down on yourself in the midst of the job search.

Perhaps you might want to keep a stack of 3X5 cards in your pocket or a file on your phone where you just record each skill as it comes to you during your day.

We are all much more talented than we usually give ourselves credit for.

Do you have this list?  Not just in your head but on paper or the computer?

If you have it in a spreadsheet, you can add columns like: “Want to do this in my next job” or “I like this”. Then grade them and sort.  Now you know what skills to look for in job descriptions.

Pick a really strong skill.  How can you use this skill in your job search this week?

20 minute webcast here

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