Who actually has the job?

Who actually has the job? Not your buddies, or you would already have it. Not your extended family either. Do you currently know the people who need your skills?

job

noun, verb, jobbed, job·bing, adjective

noun

1.  a piece of work, especially a specific task done as part of the routine of one’s occupation or for an agreed price: She gave him the job of mowing the lawn.
2.  a post of employment; full-time or part-time position: She was seeking a job as an editor.
3.  anything a person is expected or obliged to do; duty; responsibility: It is your job to be on time.
4.  an affair, matter, occurrence, or state of affairs: to make the best of a bad job.
5.  the material, project, assignment, etc., being worked upon: The housing project was a long and costly job.
  – Dictionary.com

So who actually has the job you want?

Job postings are lists of jobs.  Recruiters do the job of finding the right person for their client.  HR does the job of bringing the desired person into the company and/or may do the job of the recruiter.  But it is the hiring manager who actually has the 1.  a piece of work, especially a specific task. 

How can you be known by the hiring manager?

For a full view and more info, click here

Ten Secrets of a Successful Résumé

resumesGuest Blog by Pam Condie

 

The most important thing to keep in mind when building a résumé is its purpose:  answering the employer’s need for you to solve a problem he/she has that can’t be solved with his/her current staff.  That is the employer’s only interest in you.  Focus your résumé to answer his/her question.  That is what will get your foot in the door for a job interview.

  1.  Make your résumé long enough to tell your story but tell it succinctly.  There is a myth out in the ether that a résumé will not be read if it is longer than one page.  Wrong!  I have seen many résumés that had the life edited out of them because they were squeezed into a single page of small print – not appealing to the hiring manager.
  2.  When I worked in human resources I often found that hiring was a messy, frequently changing process.  Cover letters and résumés could get separated, particularly if we had received many responses to a job opening.  Be certain that all pages of your résumé as well as your cover letter have your name and contact information in the footer of each page.  At the bottom of your first page write “continued on next page” if you have a second page.   Otherwise the reader will not know if you have finished writing or if he/she should look around for a missing second page.
  3.  As they teach in accounting classes, “Check your work, check it and check it again.” Check for spelling and English errors.  A careless error can turn a reader off and damage your credibility as someone who pays attention to details.  Don’t depend on a software spelling feature to catch all mistakes.  The engineer who wrote the program was most likely not an English major.
  4.  Most human beings are lazy readers.  Be kind to them.  Make your font 11 or 12 point.  Smaller fonts are harder on the eyes.  Larger looks amateurish.
  5.  Times Roman is the most popular font in the US and allows more information per square inch than most others.  Pick it or one that is neither unusual nor fussy looking.  Keep things simple.
  6.  Since most people resist reading, especially reading long sentences and paragraphs, divide your résumé into smaller batches of information to invite the reader in.
  7.  The objective is the first piece of information at the top of the first page. A clear objective helps the human resources department track your document more easily.  It answers the employer’s question, “What do you want from me?”  Keep the objective brief, to the point and possibly slightly broad, i.e., “Director of Sales.” Keep in mind that you have an electronic copy of your résumé and can tweak the objective if you need to for other job openings.   (Connie disagrees with the use of objectives and feels you should have 3-5 bullet points that show the things that you can do, and like to do, that the employer needs for this job. Louise Goeckel, Let’s Go Forward.biz, suggests a headline like “Director of Sales known for _________ with talent in ________.”)
  8.  The first third of your first page is the most valuable real estate on your résumé.  The latest study shows that recruiters spend a maximum of six seconds screening your résumé for further review. State your case there in a career summary, the snapshot of your career.
  9.  Unless you are in the field of education, medicine or diplomacy or you are a new graduate, your education goes near the end of your résumé. If you had a college minor subject or a scholarship or an academic honor, do include it.
  10.  Community activities are nice to include at the end of the résumé. They demonstrate industry and the physical and mental energy for a balanced life. Be careful of mentioning activities with controversial groups here.  You never know where people’s prejudices lie in spite of what they say. (Connie disagrees.  Only include if you KNOW that the hiring manager does the same thing.)

 

Pam Condie is a former HR person and a Certified Professional Resume Writer who works with people from all industries to clarify and write their next resume.  She can be reached at www.pamcondieresumes.com

Most open positions are filled through personal networking

Personal Networking works the best for finding jobs.

Personal Networking works the best for finding jobs.

#1:  Most open positions are filled through personal networking.

Job-Postings2

Only 20% (at the most, quite possibly closer to 10%) of jobs are filled through postings on job sites or company websites.

And … HR really doesn’t have the time to sort through all the resumes of people who just want a job, any job.  Please do NOT send your resume to a company just because you want to work there when you don’t have the right skills for the job they have posted.  There simply is not enough time in the day for an HR person to really read resumes and put yours aside for a role that has not opened.

More than 50% of jobs (and perhaps as much as 85%) are filled through a direct connection with someone in the company that eventually hires you.  Employee referrals and offline (face to face) networking fill at least 45%.

So where does that leave you? 

You have to be the one to initiate the contacts.  And you need to be strategic about it.

It’s not what you know, it’s who you know – NOT

Also … just like you can’t eat an elephant in one bite, so you need to divide up and prioritize your search, target your networking in a way that makes sense to you to be hired for the position you want.

targeted networking

revised 4/18/17

Objectives on Resumes

Resume with no objectivesResumes are advertisements designed to get you an interview, not your personal mission statement.

Having an objectives on your resume still has quite a bit of noise on the internet. I think that it is a waste of space.  The company, the hiring manager and the HR person want to know if you can solve the problem they are hiring someone to solve.  Only your mother cares about your future personal development at this moment.

I used to say that if you must have an objective let it be the title of the job you are applying for so I can use it as a tag.

But even this is a waste of space.  You only get 10 seconds of viewing by the first few people who actually look at it (click here for what happens before that). If they have to think about what it is you do and where you might fit in the company, they will put you on the bottom of the pile.  Your resume is really not about you.  It is about their problem and what you can do to solve it.

Hiring managers and HR people are NOT career coaches, especially for people who are not yet contributing to the bottom line.

Here is some more advice on this issue.

Do you have an objective on your résumé?  Why?

A View from the Inside: a look inside hiring

how do you want to be found?

What happens inside a company when they post a job?

We are hiring

Have you seen this excellent Slideshare by Jenny Kahn about what happens inside the company before, during and after a company posts a job?

What hiring looks like from the inside:

 

Know, remember, like and trust

Hand outstretched for a handshakeHow does anyone get hired? 

First you have to be known.  Resumes are simply one way for the hiring manager to get to know you.  Today there are many, many ways.  Profiles online, face-to-face meetings for coffee, or beer, or golf, or… introductions by mutual friends, online or off.  You have to be known for what you can do for them.  I know lots of people who are not in the bioindustry, so I’m of no use to them for many jobs and I’m not likely to place them in my client companies.  You know many people outside your industry and there are many people you know whose industry you don’t know.  How can you be known by the people in your industry whom you want to know you?

Once known, you need to be remembered when your skills are needed.  Are you following up regularly?  You need to stay top of mind.  And you don’t want to be a stalker or annoying.  How can you help at least four times before you ask for something?

If you have met the right people and are remembered, are you liked enough for the people to want to work with you?  Studies have shown that many hires are made on “gut feelings”, which is to say, did the hiring manager like you.  It is not a good way to hire, but you might as well take it into consideration.  You will not stay employed for long if no one likes you at that company or if you don’t like them.

Trust is needed because you will be taking a part in growing their “baby”.  Whatever project you are hired to work on is the cherished idea of someone in the company.  Are you trustworthy?  Can you see, embrace and forward their vision?  And how can you convey that to the recruiter and hiring team? 

What do you think? 

Those “Hidden” Jobs

Most open jobs never make it to job boards or even the company careers page

friendly networking

 

#1:  Most open positions are filled through personal networking.

Only 20% (at the most, quite possibly closer to 10%) of jobs are filled through postings on job sites or company websites.
And … HR really doesn’t have the time to sort through all the resumes of people who just want a job, any job.  Please do NOT send your resume to a company just because you want to work there when you don’t have the right skills for the job they have posted.  There simply is not enough time in the day for an HR person to really read resumes and put yours aside for a role that has not opened.  Recent studies have shown that for every 5 resumes that get to the hiring managers desk, 1000 have been received.  If it is not obvious that you fit the description of the person they need, yours will not be one of those five.

More than 70% of jobs (and perhaps as much as 85%) are filled through a direct connection with someone in the company that eventually hires you.

Employee referrals and offline (faceto-face) networking fill at least 75% even if you have sent a resume to their website.

So where does that leave you?

You have to be the one to initiate the contacts, strategically!
You need to divide up and prioritize your search in a way that makes sense to you to be hired for the position you want.

You need to know what you have to offer – what skills you have and which ones you want to use in your next job.

You need to know what you want in your next job – what tasks you want to do, what responsibilities you desire, what commute, what company culture, what working environment, etc.  What are your criteria for the “right fit”?

What companies can offer this?  And how can you find out?  By doing your homework and then by networking!

Who do you know in each of the companies that looks good from the outside?  This should not be the hiring manager or even one of the team that you want to join.  Someone in another department will be able to tell you about those things that are not on the company’s website – commute, culture, environment, etc. 
 
Please leave your questions or comments below and sign up for your first free career step consultation if we have not yet spoken.

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How Many Applicants Get Interviewed? Will You?

You have become one of the applicants for the job you think you want next.You sweat over your resume, spend hours finding jobs on the job boards, spend even more time applying and attaching your resumes and get that email that says “thanks, we will contact you if we have a job for you” and then you wait. And wait.  And wait.

What is going on behind the closed doors?

Where most applicants' resumes go

First your resume and application are screened by the ATS– applicant tracking system – the one that asked you so many questions that seemingly had nothing to do with the position, into the file for that position, if and only if your resume contains the right title and keywords that were set up for the job.

Then it sits there and waits for the HR clerk or recruiter or perhaps, if you are very lucky, the hiring manager to run a search for the responses to the open positions. These file searches will also look for people who have applied before for similar roles, so your resume that you sent last year will still be in the system.

Appearing on the screen are only the resumes sent for that job and any that were previously sent that have used the keywords used in the job posting.  The reviewer then reads through the reduced number of files, perhaps even your resume and cover letter and makes a decision – yes, move to the next step or maybe, hold on to to see if there is anyone who is a better match and no, not for this one.  Sometimes even Oh, No!  He applied again for a different position and we never want to see him again.

This may be done once a week for 2-4 weeks as a policy.  Then the yes folder is looked at and sorted again.  The top ones, certainly no more than 10 and maybe only 5, are sent to the hiring manager to review. This can take a week or more.  Of these, perhaps three will move on to a phone screen and, if the phone screen goes well, a face to face interview.

Most job posting receive 99 “not a fit” resumes for every 1 that fits.  So if you don’t get the call, you have been screened out at one of at least 3 steps.

What can you do?  First, don’t apply for jobs that really are not a fit for your skills and experience – if you apply to the same company too many times, even if the next time really does fit you, you may already have been labeled an “Oh, NO!”.

Secondly, use the keywords and phrases in the position description liberally.  Even if there are six ways to say something, use the way it is phrased in the position description – computers are stupid and HR clerks may not really know what it is that you do.

Third, recruiters call this method “Post and Pray”.  There are many, many other ways to get hired.  Learn some of those skills at our upcoming Open Office Hours.

 

 

 

 

 

updated 3/29/17

Most open positions are filled through…

How did you get your last job?

Most open positions are filled through personal networking.

Only 20% (at the most, quite possibly closer to 10%) of jobs are filled through postings on job sites or company websites.

And … HR really doesn’t have the time to sort through all the resumes of people who just want a job, any job.  Please do NOT send your resume to a company just because you want to work there when you don’t have the right skills for the job they have posted.  There simply is not enough time in the day for an HR person to really read resumes and put yours aside for a role that has yet not opened.

More than 50% of jobs (and perhaps as much as 85%) are filled through a direct connection with someone in the company that eventually hires you.  Employee referrals and offline (face to face) networking fill at least 45%.

So where does that leave you? 

You have to be the one to initiate the contacts.  And you need to be strategic about it.

Also … just like you can’t eat an elephant in one bite, so you need to divide up and prioritize your search in a way that makes sense for you to be hired for the position you want.

Sign up for the free newsletter above for my free tips on how to create your job search strategy.

Or click here to schedule a complementary consultation

 

1000 applicants for 1 Job: 5 Tips to Getting Short-Listed

Have you been short-listed?

Have you seen Ira Wolfe’s blog How many job applicants does it take to find one qualified candidate?

Ira says, “The “war for talent” is heating up even in the midst of high unemployment. According to an article last week in the Wall Street Journal, it takes many more than most employers think (or at least want to accept.) I repeat – a lot more.  The actual numbers are numbing.

For example, an infographic presented in the article revealed that it takes approximately 1,000 online views by candidates to get 100 candidates to complete the application.  Out of that, 25 applications are selected for review, then 4 to 6 candidates are recommended for an interview. When all is said and done, companies may find their one diamond in the rough only after 1,000 candidates view the job posting.  If those numbers hold up, it is clear that the impending war for talent is no longer imminent or pending. It’s here today.”

So how can you get short-listed?

1.  Don’t apply to positions you are not qualified for.  The HR team is not in the business of figuring out where in their organization you might fit.  The hiring manager wants them to deliver just the right person with the right skills.

2.  Do identify the companies that do use your skills, do use people with your background and do exist within your reasonable commute distance.

3.  Do apply to their open position, IF and only if, they are looking for you. 

4.  Find out if any of the people in your current network of friends and acquaintances already work there and get them to introduce you to one of the people in the department you want to work in.

5.  Add this new person to your network and keep in touch.  Get the inside scoop.  Present yourself as the solution to the department’s problem.

No company hires you because you need a job.  Companies only hire when they have a problem or opportunity that can’t be solved or explored by the people they are already paying.

Your turn – what do you think?

Have a question?  Join us for Open Office Hours

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