How I Wish I Were The Fairy Job Mother Who Could Simply Grant Wishes!

fairy job motherWouldn’t it be wonderful if I were the Fairy Job Mother who could simply grant wishes? 

But I’m not that Fairy Job Mother.  I think she retired in 1929. You are the closest we can get.  It is your career after all.  And you know where you are, where you want to go and which steps will take you there.  

Here’s something you can do NOW that can ensure your career for years to come.

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Job fairs, online applications or recruiters do NOT fill 75-85% of all jobs.  But none of us have learned in school how to find a job in a way that we manage and control and which will serve us well the rest of our careers.  Since, as a recruiter, I know both sides of the job search, I can show you how to find and choose the companies you will want to work in, the people you will want to work with and how to be known by the people who will hire you.

Can you relate to this?

Once upon a time, in your grandfather’s or great grandfather’s time, it was possible to start working for a company straight out of school and retire 30 or 40 years later with a gold watch and a pension.  But not now  Now we are doing well to stay with the same company for five years before having to change companies to move up the corporate ladder or even to just keep working.  In some industries, a two-year stay is doing well.

None of us receive lessons in looking for work.  Our education is all about the core skills we need, not where and how to put them to use.  Networking is a skill that can be taught as well, but we are not taught that either.  And in this economy, no job is proof against lay-offs.

What some of my clients have said

Liora Engel-Smith   “Connie gave me excellent and detailed advice regarding entering the work force (via LinkedIn).”

Mark Zawadzki “Connie gave me clear direction and a plan that made sense. She has the ability to listen, understand the situation and sum it up quickly, and provide recommendations for moving forward. Connie was a valuable resource and I highly recommend her for anyone in search of a new position, career or contact.” (via LinkedIn)

Mike van Horn “I’m impressed with Connie’s business model. She has carved out a niche in a very competitive industry that meets the specialized needs of her clients and plays to her strengths.” (via LinkedIn)

Juliet Philips “I had contacted Connie when searching for jobs and I was very impressed with how quickly she responded. She took the time to explain and guide me through the process and gave me meaningful insights on how to go about finding a job that I want. She is someone I would recommend to all my colleagues.” (via LinkedIn)

Dan Biondi “A friend and colleague referred me to Connie for help with my search. Connie responded immediately, gave me a useable road map and advice regarding a senior level executive search. She is patient, considerate, and quite easy to engage in conversation. I came away from one conversation with meaningful insights on how to structure my personal search strategy. I will recommend Connie to anyone who has a problem that needs to be solved by a new view from an outside the company executive.”  (via LinkedIn)

Orest Hurko, MD “Remarkably thoughtful, generous and wise. Received a cold call from me when I was just starting a search, and patiently guided me through realities of finding employment — most of which had nothing to do with her services or that of any other headhunter. Though we had never met, her genuine concern was helping me out, not scoring a new client. Not many people would do that. And it worked. Excellent advice.” (via LinkedIn)


Why is it so hard to find a job?

Why is it so hard to find a job? The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics  shows us that the unemployment rate for people with a professional degree or a PhD is less than 3% which is statistically 0%. 

Why is it so hard to find a job

 

So why is it so hard to find a job, even though the economy is better than it was? Especially for fresh inexperienced graduates and well-experienced Boomers?  What is holding you back? Or tripping you up?

Many people think that you find a job like you order a book on Amazon – go online and find the one that looks interesting, click and attach your CV and wait for “the call”. Or they think that holding one of those degrees above is the “E” ticket to a good job and being chased by headhunters and HR people. It is really depressing to find out that it isn’t so.

So what is the way?  The above method is very broken.  But you can still find the right job.

You have learned hard topics, like neurobiology and brain surgery.  Job search skills are not nearly as difficult, but must still be respected, thought through and employed. 

What skills do you think you don’t have or are missing that should make it easier? Are they lab or bioscience skills?  Or are they job search skills? Can you list your job search skills the way you can your science skills?  

Bonus tip: Learning the skills of job search is easy but there is quite a bit of misinformation or outdated methods still being taught online.  

 

If you need some personal help, just book a time to talk here

 

Or How to Fail at Job Search

Here are a couple of tips to keep your self-confidence up while you are in the middle of your job search

Self-confidence can be hard to hold on to while you look for your next job. Even if that job will be CEO.

I find that creating a file or keeping a notebook or a “brag book” of what I have already

Writing

Image via Wikipedia

done in my life (not just in my current job or in my career) can be a real inspiration.

Then pick one or three and write them on a sheet of paper and post it where you can see it from your desk.

Another place to start is to have a record of your skills.  Do you have a list of them?  Set aside 10 minutes to write them down.  Just keep writing – include everything you can think of, from tying your shoes to making soufflés, from great presentation skills to a thorough knowledge of how to use a PCR, from the technical (we humans can “geek” in any technology from knitting to computers) to the commonplace.

Congratulations – look at all those skills!  And I’m sure that is not all of them.

Knowing what you have to offer will help you remember that you are not one of a faceless mass of people competing for your next job.  It will also help you not waste your time applying for jobs you really won’t fit.

Whether you are currently working full time or not, do something else that you like to do.  Volunteer with those less fortunate, teach, read to elders or children, coach a sport or….

Self-confidence is very attractive if it is true.  And if you need to “fake it, til you make it” be sure that the unstable support under that is not visible.  Better to actually be confident.

If you are worrying about getting hired for a job you really can’t do, don’t apply for that one!!  Apply for one that you KNOW you can do.

If you need some help with this, book some time with me and we can get you back on track.

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