What is Targeted Networking?

https://www.timetrade.com/book/GMKGM

Networking at a gathering

 

Most jobs are found through networking.  But you need to be strategic and targeted!

So what is targeted networking?  Check out this short video or listen to the podcast on Targeted Networking and Your Career Portfolio

And Don’t do these things

Will you meet your next boss at a holiday party?

holiday networking

A Snowy Day

 

The season of holiday parties has begun. Will you meet your next boss at your partner’s company’s holiday party? At your neighbor’s cookie exchange? What are the chances?

You have to be there anyway, so why not lay the groundwork for a new career networking buddy?

But what does that actually mean? You don’t want to seem desperate and needy. Nor do you want to be a “used car salesman” – aggressive and pushy. So what do you do?

Targeted Networking at Holiday Parties

Because you are smart and know what you want to do next AND you know which companies meet your criteria, you can ask people if they know anyone at X or Y or Z companies. Are they at the party? Could the person you are talking with introduce you?

But be aware that if they do you that favor, you have to return it! Whom do they want to be introduced to? What do you know that they want to know?

NO elevator speeches

NO elevator speeches – you don’t want to listen to them, what makes you think anyone else wants to listen to yours? Be interested in what the other person has to say, what they think about, what they do. Build a connection that you can come back to – don’t burn bridges!!

What parties are on your schedule?

If you want to talk more about your job search, set up a time to talk here.

How I Wish I Were The Fairy Job Mother Who Could Simply Grant Wishes!

fairy job motherWouldn’t it be wonderful if I were the Fairy Job Mother who could simply grant wishes? 

But I’m not that Fairy Job Mother.  I think she retired in 1929. You are the closest we can get.  It is your career after all.  And you know where you are, where you want to go and which steps will take you there.  

Here’s something you can do NOW that can ensure your career for years to come.

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Job fairs, online applications or recruiters do NOT fill 75-85% of all jobs.  But none of us have learned in school how to find a job in a way that we manage and control and which will serve us well the rest of our careers.  Since, as a recruiter, I know both sides of the job search, I can show you how to find and choose the companies you will want to work in, the people you will want to work with and how to be known by the people who will hire you.

Can you relate to this?

Once upon a time, in your grandfather’s or great grandfather’s time, it was possible to start working for a company straight out of school and retire 30 or 40 years later with a gold watch and a pension.  But not now  Now we are doing well to stay with the same company for five years before having to change companies to move up the corporate ladder or even to just keep working.  In some industries, a two-year stay is doing well.

None of us receive lessons in looking for work.  Our education is all about the core skills we need, not where and how to put them to use.  Networking is a skill that can be taught as well, but we are not taught that either.  And in this economy, no job is proof against lay-offs.

What some of my clients have said

Liora Engel-Smith   “Connie gave me excellent and detailed advice regarding entering the work force (via LinkedIn).”

Mark Zawadzki “Connie gave me clear direction and a plan that made sense. She has the ability to listen, understand the situation and sum it up quickly, and provide recommendations for moving forward. Connie was a valuable resource and I highly recommend her for anyone in search of a new position, career or contact.” (via LinkedIn)

Mike van Horn “I’m impressed with Connie’s business model. She has carved out a niche in a very competitive industry that meets the specialized needs of her clients and plays to her strengths.” (via LinkedIn)

Juliet Philips “I had contacted Connie when searching for jobs and I was very impressed with how quickly she responded. She took the time to explain and guide me through the process and gave me meaningful insights on how to go about finding a job that I want. She is someone I would recommend to all my colleagues.” (via LinkedIn)

Dan Biondi “A friend and colleague referred me to Connie for help with my search. Connie responded immediately, gave me a useable road map and advice regarding a senior level executive search. She is patient, considerate, and quite easy to engage in conversation. I came away from one conversation with meaningful insights on how to structure my personal search strategy. I will recommend Connie to anyone who has a problem that needs to be solved by a new view from an outside the company executive.”  (via LinkedIn)

Orest Hurko, MD “Remarkably thoughtful, generous and wise. Received a cold call from me when I was just starting a search, and patiently guided me through realities of finding employment — most of which had nothing to do with her services or that of any other headhunter. Though we had never met, her genuine concern was helping me out, not scoring a new client. Not many people would do that. And it worked. Excellent advice.” (via LinkedIn)


SECRET #2: Strategic Networking

 

Networking ad 3SECRET #2:  Strategic Networking

So what is strategic networking?  It is not handing out your personal card at every party or event, nor is it just getting on LinkedIn, etc.

Strategic networking is using your time in a targeted manner to connect with the people who will be your career network for the rest of your career.

To be strategic you need to know a few things:

What exactly do you want to do in your next job? – write it down!

Where exactly do you want to work? – locally or can you move?

What companies are in that locale?

Which ones do you think are interesting and would need your skills?  Costco doesn’t hire biotech scientists.

Who do you know who works at each one?  Not the hiring manager and not the person who is trying to do your job and his own.

The people you need to network with first are the ones who can give you the inside scoop about the company.

Finding Your Industry and Companies

Do you know which industry and companies have your next job?

You need at least 30 companies when you start a job search.  Do you have yours?

Do you know at least 2 people who work at each one?

Here is a short webcast to help you get started

Complimentary Job Search Seminar: Industry, Companies and People

For more personal help, consider a short consultation.

which industry companies?

Don’t be a Networking Nuisance

don't be a networking nuisance

Don’t beg for a job like Oliver Twist!

Does networking makes you feel like Oliver Twist, begging for another bowl of gruel?  That you are bothering people?

Well, that is NOT networking!

Networking is where you give something that doesn’t cost you much and your networking partner receives something that he/she values and the other way as well.  You need to give at least four times before you ask for something. Networking is not a one-time event.  It includes, at the least, 5 follow-up connections (emails, letters, phone calls, coffee dates, etc.)

So what can you give?

Time, attention and active listening – with our short attention spans these days, truly attentive, active listening (not planning what you are going to say next) is a rare and precious gift.

Knowledge – you are spending your time wrapping your arms around your industry (especially if you are networking for your next job).  Put the information you are gathering for your search in a “swipe file” so that you can share it with the people to whom you have listened and with whom you are networking. Send them the information that connects with what they have talked about.

Links – you are also collecting links of information. Save the web pages in a Favorites file on your browser titled Swipe for Job Search or Swipe for (your department or industry here). You will want these for general networking and also specifically for follow up with the people you have talked with about their problems at their companies.

Connections – as you grow your LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, Labroots, Naymz, Viadeo, etc networks, you can connect your new networking connections to others that they might be interested in. Remember that your career network is one that will last you for the rest of your career and you will find jobs for people in your network as much as they find jobs for you.

What other ways can you think of that you can give to your network?

Another job search coach, J.T. O’Donnell, has also talked about this.

Want to talk about it?  Book a call here!

Targeted Networking: Connecting with the right people

We had a great webinar today about Targeted Networking for your career, but I was all thumbs on the tech and it did not record properly.  So I re-recorded it and here it is for those of you who could not make an 11 am call.

You don’t need to be known by many, many people: the beekeepers of Africa and the shepherds of Mongolia probably don’t need to know your name.  But you do want to be known by the people you work with or want to work with.  You want to know them and be known to them as someone who is a member of their “tribe” and who speaks the same jargon about the problems in your field.  

But before they can know you, you have to find them and introduce yourself. You don’t want to spin your wheels with the people who are not a future “member of your tribe” if you are urgently looking for your next job.  (Of course these other people can make your life far more interesting, but not in a targeted, strategic way!)

So where can you find them?  Watch the video above or come to Open Office Hours and we can talk about it.

Please do leave your comments or questions below!

 

What you need at a bioscience networking event

Your bioscience networking kit:

Do you carry these bioscience networking tools in your pocket?

Your Business Cards

business card image

(Vistaprint.com or Moo.com)

  • It should have your name, with letters if you have them (PhD, MD, MBA, etc.)
  • Your Headline/tagline (from your LinkedIn or G+ Profiles)
  • How to contact you:
    • Mobile or Google phone number
    • Email address (dignified or just for job search – @gmail.com or even @yahoo.com or @hotmail.com)
    • Your LinkedIn URL:  www.linkedin.com/in/yourname

(How to get your very own LinkedIn URL)

A business card holder

Your phone

– to capture info – get their mobile number and text to them immediately:

I don’t answer calls from people I don’t know.  Perhaps you don’t either.  I really enjoyed talking with you  today at (insert meeting name here) – Your name

 

Nice name tag

on your right shoulder or lapel, near your face:

Pocket for the cards you collect

with a pen to make a note on the card about the person, the topic of conversation, the event and
Pens

notebookandpen

perhaps a calendar

or your phone to actually schedule a 1 on 1 coffee meeting

Breath mints

breathmints
Hand sanitizer

Comb

But most of all : A plan for that event

Want to discuss your plan?  Schedule a call here

 

Business Cards – the more the better: Myth #4

4 Networking Meeting Don’ts

Maintaining Your Career Network

Career Network puzzle

Your career network is important and not just when you are looking for a job.

Do you make time each week to reconnect with someone in your career network?

Once you get a job that you love, it is tempting to stop networking.  It took quite a bit of time to have coffee or lunch with people at all those companies in your niche.

But what happens if you do stop?  Slowly they forget about you.  You are no longer on top of what is happening in your industry niche and you get comfortable in your current role.

Most jobs last from 2-5 years.

If you ignore your network, don’t give four times for every one time you ask for something, and simply disappear, then in 2-5 years you will be faced with the corpse of your previous reputation.  Your “brand” will be tarnished and it will be like coming back to an abandoned lover and begging to be taken back.

So keep on networking!

Keep on sending “saw this and thought of you” emails, keep on meeting for coffee or lunch, even if you really don’t want to work for the company they are currently working in.  Their job will only last 2-5 years too.  And you may be interested in where they work next. Or interested in hiring them, or ….

Networking is the art of finding, AND Keeping, business friends.

Let me know if I can be of any help to you in this endeavor.  And check the website for articles on the “How-To”.

Connie Hampton
Dedicated to helping bioscience job seekers find the right next job and bioscience companies find the right next employee
Consultant
Hampton & Associates
Scientific & Executive Search Services
And
Bioscience Job Search Kit, a service of Hampton & Associates
connie@hamptonexecutivesearch.com
www.hamptonexecutivesearch.com

(510) 601-1343
LinkedIn
G+
Facebook
For a short complimentary job search strategy call, book here: https://www.timetrade.com/book/GMKGM
Get my newest book: How to Find Your Next Job: 52 Job Search Tips
www.amazon.com/author/conniehampton

Are You Using Your LinkedIn Profile to Your Greatest Advantage

LinkedIn Profile https://biosciencejobkit.com/linkedin-profile-turn-off/

Do you use your LinkedIn profile to its greatest advantage?  Even a free account, well-used, can put you at the front of the pack.

All headhunters and most in-house recruiters, HR people and hiring managers use LinkedIn to look at candidates.  What are you showing them? Are you using LI to add depth to what you highlighted in your resume?

Your name needs to be just your name (with the exception that adding the best letters you have earned (PhD, MD, MBA) is good). To add LION or an email address is breaking the agreement you made with LinkedIn.  There are other places to put these.

Are you using your Headline to highlight your best features or your passions or what you want next?  This is not the place for your current title – that goes further down. But don’t say anything that makes you look desperate – no “Looking” or “Actively Seeking”.  Desperate is not attractive.

Is your Industry a match for what you are looking for?  Research is not the same as Biotechnology or Pharmaceuticals. 

Have you gotten your personal LinkedIn URLwww.linkedin.com/in/yourname  shows that you use the platform to its fullest and know what you are about.

How many Connections do you have?  You need at least 400 but 500+ are better. LinkedIn is not a place to tell personal stories or connections, it is a place for professional ones.  Who do you know professionally? Who is, or should be, in your career network? If you routinely connect with the people you meet in the ordinary course of your profession, you will soon have 400 or more.  They will find you jobs and you will find jobs for them as well.

Your list of Experience is just that – experience, not necessarily jobs- but remember that there is a section for volunteer work as well.  You get 1000 characters to describe each Experience.  What problems were you hired to solve or discovered after you were hired?  What action did you take? What was the result of your actions? Tell us a “dragon-slaying” story.

You can only get Endorsements from your first degree connections and you want them to be for the 10 (or more) skills you want to use in your next job.  Ask for them.  Tell your connections which ones you would like to be endorsed for and ask them which of theirs you should endorse.  These skills are the keywords that recruiters are looking for.

Your Summary (usually placed first but written last) is your chance to show, in first person, what you are good at, what you are professionally passionate about.  You can use your keywords in natural sentences and you can tell your best “dragon-slaying” story.  How can you make it attractive, even charismatic?  You get 2000 characters to do this.

Have you included your Volunteer experience and causes? 

Have you added documents, links, publications, slides, videos to demonstrate your professional expertise?

You can list projects and courses – be careful here – don’t list undergraduate classes that are irrelevant to what you have been doing or want to do.

The Interests section is where you can add anything that did not fit elsewhere – you get 1000 characters.

Do use the Advice for Contacting. Even if you are not now looking for work, you will be in the future.  Why give LinkedIn control of who can contact you? 

In personal details, don’t put married or number of children – these are protected by law and is really not the business of your professional connections.  Add your birthday if you would like to receive birthday greetings. You don’t need to put in a year.

Are your Organizations appropriate or even useful? Do you belong to a group that helps it members find jobs? Fraternities, sororities, Masons, etc?

What LinkedIn Groups are shown on your Profile?  You can decide which ones to show in the Settings for each group.  Show the professional ones, not the job search ones.

Who are you following?  Choose the best in your industry.

What companies are you following? Choose the competitors in your niche and the companies you most want to work for next.

Follow your alma mater and the colleges and universities where the best people in your niche went to school.

For a step-by-step Profile Template for LinkedIn and other social media sites, Check out the free Checklist on the right!

For more help click here!

 

Do You Use These Alternatives to Your Resume?

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