Make it easy for people to get in touch with you about jobs

Make it easy for people to get in touch with you. 

How easy is it for people not currently in your network to get in touch with you?

Social Network concept in 3d

How can recruiters and hiring managers get in touch with you? You might want to have an email address just for your job search.  I recommend a gmail account.

It is your “loose connections” or your distant ones that will be most likely to have your next job for you.  Don’t network with recruiters – we will find you if we have a job you seem to fit, but do network with people at the companies you want to work in.  Maintain your connections, say “Happy Birthday” or Congratulations on work anniversary, promotion or new job!  And keep adding to the network.  Your limit is 30,000!

Here is what you have to do on LinkedIn to allow recruiters and hiring managers to email you directly.

Go to your picture in the upper right hand corner (in the black bar)

Hover and click on Settings and Privacy

Go to the Privacy Tab

Click on “Who can see your email address”

And change it to Everyone or at least 1st and 2nd-degree connections 

If you don’t want the emails from anyone, change it to Only you

But why do that?  What are you on LinkedIn for? 

 

Who can see connie@hamptonexecutivesearch.com on your profile?

  • Only you
  • 1st-degree connections
  • 1st and 2nd-degree connections
  • Everyone on LinkedIn

You can control what email address is your primary in your email settings and learn more about how your email address is visible to other members on LinkedIn.

Need some help with your LinkedIn Profile?  Click here

Is Your LinkedIn Profile a Dud?

Visible online so hiring managers and recruiters can find you

How to build and develop your LinkedIn Profile

The new LinkedIn

LinkedIn keeps “refining” their website.  

Here is a look at LinkedIn’s latest changes and what the job seeker needs to know.


For a checklist for your Profile, Click here

Be Visible

No one can hire you if they don’t know you exist!! So be visible!!!

Once upon a time, you could get a good job by walking into the company and asking the receptionist for an application.  She probably knew your father or at least her boss did. You were visible to your neighbors and your parents’ friends.

Now we live in a world where you don’t know everyone and everyone does not know you.  So you have to do a few things to be visible.  And I don’t mean pink hair (although that will not stop you in most jobs any more).

So fill out your LinkedIn Profile!  Get a checklist for doing so here

And look for other places on the internet where you have some unused property: G+, Twitter, your trade associations, like RAPS or others.  Are you presenting yourself in a professional and attractive (to hiring managers) way.

If you need some help with this, Click here

Target Your Message and Your Job Search

4 kinds of resumes

Have you been sold a bill of good?

Do you have an interview suit?

Do you have an interview suit?  It doesn’t do much good hanging in your closet.

A LinkedIn Profile is like your interview suit – it shows what you want a potential employer to see about you.  It is (or should be) much more comprehensive than a resume (an ad for an interview about how you can solve that hiring manager’s problem).  And it needs to be filled with the words that convey your abilities, expertise, skills, etc.  In real English language sentences that talk about the problem you were hired to solve, what you did and the consequences of your actions.

These treasure words need to be in your headline as well – not merely the last title some company gave you.  But the answer to the question, “Who is Your Name?”  Ah, yes, she is the one who…….

Your profile needs to be updated every year, even if you are not looking for a job this year.  But it is now 2018.  Do you want your current job forever?

If I can be of any help to you, please do book a call to talk

 

networking, follow up and email (signatures.)

 

Bioscience Job Search Steps

What is a resume?

Your Resume is NOT About You

Do You Use These Alternatives to Your Resume?

Do You REALLY Need a Resume for EVERY Job???

How to build and develop your LinkedIn Profile

Your LinkedIn Profile

How to build and develop your LinkedIn profile

How to build and develop your LinkedIn Profile.  It is necessary that you be visible online.  LinkedIn is the premier professional site, but you probably have others – trade associations, G+, etc.  Post there as well!

The job seeker’s tasks are:

To be visible online, known to the people in the companies you want to work for, remembered before they hire someone else, liked and trusted to solve their problem.

The podcast is above but if you would like to see the webcast, click here

For more help, check out the products and programs offered in the menu or email me at connie@biosciencejobkit.com

Why Dragon-Slaying Stories?

Is Your LinkedIn Profile a Dud?

How Recruiters use Your LinkedIn Profile to Screen People Out or In

Do You Want to Be Found by Recruiters and Hiring Managers?

How Can I Customize My Bioscience Online Job Search

Hi I’m Connie Hampton of Hampton and Associates, Scientific and Executive Search Services.  One of our services is Bioscience Job Kit.

Today’s topic is how to customize online job search.

I don’t recommend an entirely online job search but there are some things you can do to customize it and make it better. You can get a little closer to what it is you want.

Know your bioscience industry:
identify which bioscience industry or function fits you best.  When people come to me and say “I want a job, any job” you really need to know that there are no any jobs. Jobs are specific; companies are specific; industries are specific. So get started with the easy one: which industry or function fits you best? If you’re a microbiology scientist, that will tell you not to look at Macy’s.

You need to know what it is you’re selling. We all have many skills we don’t want to get paid for: cleaning refrigerators is mine. So make a list of your key skills and all the ways that those particular skills are described in your industry.

Be sure to be visible with these keywords. Use them in all of your online profiles: LinkedIn, of course, but also anything where you have a username and password will probably have a profile. Using them there! You might as well come up more frequently on Google and the search engines! Also, use them as hashtags. LinkedIn has decided to participate in the hashtag world. Use them on your twitter accounts! Go find people that use these hashtags. Go find groups that use them and join those groups.

Know your company criteria. This is one that most people already do know how to do, but let’s get really granular. Make a list of what you actually need in your next company. It could be location; it could be therapeutic area; it could be size of company; it could be funding; it could be their current relationship with the FDA. What’s your list of company criteria? I have a free downloadable initial list about bioscience company criteria, but make your own list!

Know which companies actually meet those criteria. Go online to Google or LinkedIn to find these companies. If you’ve decided you don’t want to move there is absolutely no point in including companies in Australia, in less you live in Australia. Start making your list of all those companies that seem to meet most of your criteria.

You are not going to be able to get down intimately into the companies with your online search, so that’s why the next question is who do you know who works in each of these companies. Using LinkedIn, your other groups, or just your friends identify one person in each of your companies. This person cannot give you a job. The only person who can really is the hiring manager. You don’t want to go there yet because you still need the inside scoop on the rest of your company criteria to help you narrow down that list of companies (probably 30 or more) down to the 10 that are most attractive, meet more of your criteria and that you can identify.

Do you have a friend there already? Take them out to coffee and pick their brains! Is it really a good company to work for? Or are they thinking about jumping ship? If you don’t currently have a friend there yet, get introduced! Find the person who is linked to your friend as well is your friend is linked to you. Take them both the coffee. LinkedIn helps with this. They’ll tell you who your first-degree connection is and who is their 1st degree connection (your second). You can get introduced!

Then network: provide these people, that you’re having coffee with, something they need and find out if it’s good to work for their company. Ask about the other pieces on your criteria list that you could not find online.

Working with my bioscience job search coach on my bioscience online job search

Working with my bioscience job search coach on my bioscience online job search

Ask your new networking partner at that particular company to introduce you to someone in the department you want to join. Because you can’t just expect HR to be able to identify where you would fit best. It’s not their job and you need to know which departments would be most effective for you, where you would be most effective.

When you meet with this second person, get the inside scoop on what problem they’re working on and the language they use to describe it. They may be working on a problem you have no desire to work on or one that excites you. The words they use will become very important when you write up your resume.

Your next task is to be remembered, liked, and trusted. So you need to follow up regularly to be remembered, liked, and trusted. You can do it on LinkedIn; you can do it on email; you can do it with paper and a stamp but follow-up! Send them links to things they might be interested in, “saw this and thought of you” kinds of emails, “I was looking up your problem the other day at in PubMed and found this paper. It is it out of date. Does it have anything useful for you?” Those kinds of things.

Check the companies career page daily to see if they are looking for you now. If you don’t match at least 85% of the online position description, don’t apply. It’s not your job. When you do apply online you need to use the words that are in the position description, as well as the words that you’ve discovered they used to talk about their problem because there is frequently a drop of information between the hiring manager, the HR person, and the job post. So use both so that you can get through the applicant tracking system program as well as catch the eye of the hiring manager.

Now you want to write a resume, possibly before you apply online, but definitely after you have found out what words they’re using. You want to write a resume for this company, this problem, this position.

What you do with it: only send it to that one bioscience company. It’s not applicable to other companies. Do not spam 30 companies with a resume that is generic. They’re not going to look at it. You want your information to fall off the top half of the first page of your two-page resume using the words they used to talk about their problem and showing that you can in fact solve it.

For more information check out biosciencejobkit.com or for schedule a free 15 minute coaching session or email me Connie@biosciencejobkit.com

Of course these steps work for other industries as well.

Thanks so much and have a great day!

Other links:

Where are you in your job search?

Why is it so hard to find a job?

Which is better? A recruiter or applying online?

Visible online so hiring managers and recruiters can find you

https://biosciencejobkit.com/at-a-glance/

Be visible online

Being visible online is the 2nd main step, after you know what you have to offer, how your industry talks about that and what you want in your ideal job.

Being visible is both online and in person.  Even shy people can do this.

Of course we think first of LinkedIn and there are a number of posts here about it.  But LinkedIn is NOT the be all and end all of online visibility.  Other social media is also useful.  G+ if you have a Gmail account can be quite useful, especially if someone simply “googles” your name.  But you want your keywords to bring you up too!

Twitter is also a good place to be.  Be sure that your Twitter account (perhaps your 2nd or 3rd Twitter handle) is professional and not full of “sex, religion or politics”.  Join groups centered around your industry and niche, engage in Twitter chats, follow people who are influencers or who work at companies you want to join.  Contribute.

The best places to be are your particular trade associations and societies.  Here is a link to some of the ones I’ve belonged to or use in my recruiting.  If you have a user name and password, you probably have a profile.  Use that space to tell your colleagues and others who look at it what it is that you do and want to do next.  Here is my profile at RAPS

Where are you visible?

Do you have questions about your safety online?  about how to present yourself? You can’t be hired unless someone knows you and putting all your eggs in one resume basket will not get you the job.  You will need to use the words you discovered in step one – Know what you can and want to do, what it is called and what your ideal job would be.   But keeping that close to your chest will not allow anyone else to “see” you in their company, solving their problems.

For a review of any of these profiles, sign up for a quick review or a more comprehensive one.

 

 

Ways of Using LinkedIn in your Job Search

LinkedIn in your job search

Image via Wikipedia

LinkedIn is a really important tool for your job search.

Of course you have completely filled out your profile on LinkedIn, yes?  And not simply posted a generic resume.  Instead, you have written about the skills you enjoy using and what you have done with them.  You have filled it out as completely as possible and also posted a good picture of you, smiling.

While you are on your profile site, click on the “number of people who have viewed your profile in the last 3 days” button on the right hand side. Do this daily.

These are your first and second degree connections by name and anonymous if more distantly connected.  You can connect with your second degree viewers in many ways – directly, through a first degree connection (check on the viewers profile), through a group you both belong to (you do belong to appropriate groups, yes?), or through the use of Inmail.

Thank them for looking at your profile.

Ask them what you can do for them today.  Interact! Network!  It doesn’t take much time at all!

You need at least 400 people in your LinkedIn Connections to really make this work for you. Most need to be people in your niche, not recruiters, or even your college roommates if they are not in your industry.

“Business friends” are the ones you will work for, find jobs for and who will find jobs for you.  Who are yours?  Do you have a list on your computer?  Do you contact them regularly, even when you are NOT looking for a job?

LinkedIn in your job search is not the only tool.

Your email and social media are important as well.  The phone is too.  Do you know how to use them, long before you write a resume?

Need some help figuring out who they should be or how to keep in contact with them?  Book a coaching call here.  ($125/30 minutes)

What do you look like on social media?

social media is crucial

Social Media can make or break your chances of getting hired.  

Many people WILL look you up on social media like LinkedIn, G+, or even Facebook to see who you are, what you present, even what your politics are.

Hiring managers and recruiters will surely look at your social media presence.

I look up people I’m meeting in coffee shops so that I don’t have to bother people I’m NOT meeting.  Do you have your picture on your LinkedIn Profile or G+ Profile?  Can I tell it is you? Or is it you in the distance? Or do I need to figure out which of the 3 people in the picture is you? 

What will Hiring Managers and recruiters see?  

Do they have to dedicate hours to finding your last embarrassing picture from that party in high school? (which, of course, they won’t.)  Or is it right there, easy to find and perfect for trashing your chances of even getting a phone call for that professional job?  Of course you know to remove them, but what if someone else has it on their page and tags you?  What about Instagram or other, newer forms of social media?   

Or, if you graduated from high school before the internet preserved our mistakes for posterity, is your LinkedIn Profile skimpy?

Is it hard to read, making it impossible to imagine you doing what the hiring manager needs to have done? Or have you posted your grab-bag resume instead of choosing your words carefully? This is your personal “online real estate”.  It is your billboard and you want it to be at least presentable.  

Do you need help discovering “your” words?  Writing them in good “dragon-slaying” stories?  Knowing how to use the more interesting parts of the Profile? Did you know that you can put slides, pictures, documents, even videos on your LinkedIn Profile? How can use use this to be more easily found by the people who need your skills?

One of the tasks of the job seeker (or even consultant) is to be visible online, since that is where we go now to find people and solutions.  If you are afraid of identity theft or too many emails, there are certainly steps you can take.  If you never want another job or client, are now retired or being “kept” and are certain that life-as-you-know-it will not change in your lifetime, then don’t be visible!  But if you know that change is, protect your personal brand by keeping your social media serving your own best interests!   

Click here for some help!

How Recruiters use Your LinkedIn Profile to Screen People Out or In

LinkedIn Headlines 600x250

LinkedIn Profiles are the “low hanging fruit” of internet recruiting search.  

 

I use LinkedIn’s advanced people search to find people who have the keywords I’m looking for in their profile.  This starts with title and department but also includes education, keywords specific to this job, etc.

  • Be sure that your keywords are “optimized”
  • Spelling and grammar count

I search for these people and others on the LinkedIn Groups that high achievers in this field might post in.  I read their comments and postings to see if they can present information in a cogent and clear way.

If I feel that I have a good list of all the people whom I’m looking for, then and only then, will I contact each one to ask for a fresh resume – I send or tell them what we are looking for, see if they might be interested and ask for that résumé.  It needs to be a fresh resume, highlighting the things that my client needs to have done, not a generic one sent to the world, and certainly not “did you see my LinkedIn Profile? That’s it.”

This is pretty simple, but the implications for the job seeker are:

Have a picture – most professionals do and it needs to be professional, not you and your sweetie (especially if you have one of those names that could be either male or female) or you on that mountain in the distance, or you in your swimming suit on the beach.  A “head shot”!  Even if it is a selfie.

Use the Headline space to highlight what you do – most use it for their current title (although you would be surprised at how many people don’t change that when they move to a different job!)  There are places for your current and previous titles further down, so use this to tell us what makes you attractive for the job you want. Complete this sentence: “Oh, s/he is the one who…..”

Use the Summary to tell people more about what you are interested in.  Many people just plop in a résumé.  This is a different space where you can tell potential employers (and co-workers, current employer, various business friends, your old college pals, etc.) what you like about your current job and what you do, what you are passionate about and how that shows up in your job.  You can demystify your title, speak in plain language or use the jargon of your specialty.   Don’t waste the space by just duplicating your résumé!  You can also put your email address here  (or in Advice to Contact) so that recruiters and hiring managers you are not currently connected with can get in touch with you.

Fill out Specialties, Skills and Experience – These are those very important key words and using them will allow recruiters to find you faster.  You should ask your connections to endorse your Skills and Experience – thus providing social proof that you actually have these. Remember to endorse them for the Skills they want.

Give and get some narrative Recommendations as well.  This should be people you have worked with: former bosses, former co-workers, former employees as well as vendors and clients.

Did you know that the sections of the Profile can be moved around? 

Drag the sections that are most pertinent to the places that you want them.

Did you know that you can add all kinds of things to each section?

You can post documents that you want to publicize – perhaps a report that shows what you can do?  Your publications list? Etc. You can connect your Blog if you have one,  SlideShare PowerPoint presentations,  your website,  a poll you want to run, events you are attending or hosting.

Whom do you want to attract?  Don’t just be a blank – fill it in!

And let me know so I can look at it!

 

May you find your next career step soon!

 

 

 

 

Is Your LinkedIn Profile a Dud?

%d bloggers like this: